History Legislation

History Legislation - Federal Legislation Impacting...

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Federal Legislation Impacting Agricultural Education Era I
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Foundation Legislation Morrill Land-Grant Act - 1862 Establishes Land-Grant Universities in each state. Hatch Act - 1887 Establishes state agricultural experiment stations. Morrill Amendment -1890 Addition of 1890 Land-Grant Institutions.
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Precursors to Agricultural Education Precursors to Agricultural Education Burkett-Pollard Bill (NE) (1906) sought federal aid for the teaching of agriculture in normal (teacher training) schools Clay-Livingston Bill (GA) - 1907 sought federal aid to establish an agricultural high school in each congressional district in the United States
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Precursors to Agricultural Education Precursors to Agricultural Education Nelson Amendment (1907) Amendment to the Morrill Act of 1890 provided $5,000 for five years, $25,000 annually after five year to land-grant colleges for general support. One special provision of the amendment opened the door to prepare teachers of agriculture . . .
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Precursors to Agricultural Education Precursors to Agricultural Education Nelson Amendment Continued: money could be used “for providing courses for the special preparation of instructors for teaching the elements of agriculture and the mechanical arts.” summer school sessions for teachers were utilized extensively (especially elementary teachers) some 4 year teacher training in agriculture started
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Precursors to Agricultural Education Precursors to Agricultural Education Davis Bill (MN) (1907) sought federal support for secondary school instruction in agriculture, home economics and the mechanical arts and branch experiment stations
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Precursors McLaughlin Bill (1909) sought federal support for extension work Dolliver-Davis Bill (1910) sought federal support for extension work and secondary vocational education (Dolliver submitted two bills one for extension, one for vocational education but they were combined by the Senate Ag Committee. Things looked good for the bill but Dolliver unexpectedly died)
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Precursors to Agricultural Education Precursors to Agricultural Education Page Bill (1911, 1912, 1913) sought federal support for extension work, branch experiment stations and secondary vocational education (this was basically the Dolliver bill) The bill never passed for a variety of reasons bills tried to accomplish too much, which divided the support Page was not very skilled as a legislator
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Success! Smith-Lever Act (1914) established the extension service Smith-Hughes Act (1917) provided federal funds to support vocational education in the public schools
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Smith-Hughes Funds Provided money to: Pay salaries of teachers, supervisors, and directors of agricultural subjects Develop a Federal Board for Vocational Education
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History Legislation - Federal Legislation Impacting...

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