Learning Styles Characteristics

Learning Styles - Learner Readiness Learner Maslows Hierarchy Piagets Cognitive Stages Instructional Relationships Instructional STUDENT OUTCOMES

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Learner Readiness Learner Readiness Maslow’s Hierarchy Piaget’s Cognitive Stages
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Instructional Relationships Instructional Relationships STUDENT OUTCOMES Learning Style Lesson Cycle Teaching Style Learning Environment
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Doing the Real Thing Simulating the Real Experience Doing a Dramatic Presentation Giving a Talk Participating in a Discussion Seeing It Done on Location Watching a Demonstration Looking at an Exhibit Watching a Movie Looking at Pictures Hearing Words Reading Nature of Involvement Passive Active Receiving/ Participating Doing Visual Receiving Verbal Receiving After 2 weeks we tend to remember. .. 10% of what we read 20% of what we hear 30% of what we see 50% of what we hear and see 70% of what we say 90% of what we say and do Edgar Dale, Audio-Visual Methods in Teaching (3rd Edn.), Holt, Rinehart, and Winston (1969). Dale’s Cone of Experience Dale’s Cone of Experience
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Learning Style Defined Learning Style Defined Learning Style - “the composite of characteristics cognitive, affective, and physiological factors that serve as relatively stable indicators of how a learner perceives, interacts with, and responds to the learning environment” (Keefe, 1979)
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So What is a Learning Style? So What is a Learning Style? Preferred way a student processes information. Refers to individual differences in how we perceive, think, solve problems, learn, and relate to others (Witkin, Moore, Goodenough, and Cox 1977)
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Who’s Got the Right Style? Who’s Got the Right Style? INFORMAL Sensory Approach Keirsey - Personality Baxter Magolda Gregoric Mind Styles Witkin Perry Model Kolb - Experiential Grasha Belenky Gardner - Multiple Intelligences Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Group Embedded Figures Test - GEFT
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First Things First First Things First A number of things must be considered before a student’s learning style can be an effective tool: Students’ and Teacher’s Personality Students’ and Teacher’s Brain Dominance Students’ and Teacher’s Learning Style Students’ and Teacher’s Intelligences
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Understanding Yourself and Understanding Yourself and Others Personality Profile Others Personality Profile by: Anita Reed
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Personality Profile Personality Profile There are no “right” or “wrong” or “good or “bad” answers! If you score 9 or 10 or above, you are strong or
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This note was uploaded on 01/16/2012 for the course AGSD 420 taught by Professor Kylemcgregor during the Spring '11 term at Tarleton.

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Learning Styles - Learner Readiness Learner Maslows Hierarchy Piagets Cognitive Stages Instructional Relationships Instructional STUDENT OUTCOMES

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