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Tarleton Tips - NOTE-TAKlNG NUGGETS 0F WISDOM TWMUMW The...

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Unformatted text preview: NOTE-TAKlNG NUGGETS 0F WISDOM TWMUMW The form of notes a student uses has a profound impact upon how easily or how difficult that information is remembered later. Consider these guidelines—— 1. Use color. You can increase the recall of information a minimum of 50% by studying it in color. We tend to recall easily that which is outstanding, different, and unique. By using different colors for different concepts or sections, the words automatically stand out one from the other. Your visual memory helps you to recall important points. 2. Use pictures, symbols, images. include more than just words in your notes. Draw pictures, symbols, graphic representations that relate to the words. A picture truly is worth a thousand words. Studying pictures coupled with printed information activates both sides of the brain which makes learning easier and faster. 3. Use loose-leaf notebook(s) and write on only one side of the paper. This allows you to remove pages when studying for tests. You have a psychological advantage when you see a few pages of notes before you instead of 50 or 100 pages. Your brain tells you that “you can handle this task easily" rather than “I’ll never learn all this material.” You can insert professors' handouts in the appropriate sections thereby keeping related information together. 4. Create mind maps. Mind maps enable you to “see the big picture” of a chapter, a unit of study, ajoumal article, a process, etc. Turning a sheet of unlined paper horizontally, print the main topic, idea, or title of the chapter in the middle of the page. Draw a shape around it. Add branches that represent sub-topics related to the main idea in the center. Add details to the branches using key words and phrases and personalize the map by drawing pictures and symbols. Make each branch a different color and use different shapes for each to increase “outstandingness.” Mind maps make your notes memorable. (Videotapes, books, and handouts are available through the TLC for those interested in developing the skill of mind mapping.) 5. Date notes. Dates enable you to locate a set of information quickly when needed. 7.12s 6. Create memorable notes from your original notes taken in ctass. You will benefit from restructuring your notes after class so that you actively interact with the information rather than passively read notes that may or may not be well-organized, readable, and interesting to study. It is doubtfui ifjust “rewriting” your notes is helpful. You might want to....... o “Chunk” all sections or parts that go together. If the professor skipped back and forth between concepts in the lecture, put alt the information together that goes with the specific concepts. Information that is connected, related, associated in some way visually on the page is more easily remembered than notes that switch back and forth between main ideas just as the lecturer presented them. o Create new notes from handouts of the presenter’s Powerpoint presentation. Professors sometimes distribute copies of their slides used in a lesson. Change that format into mind maps or outlines so that information can be clustered under appropriate headings. Powerpoint handouts separate the information into individual visual units that you must then re—organize to connect or associate information that goes together. The brain learns faster when information is chunked together and stored under key words or key concepts. 9 Create visually interesting notes on the computer using Inspiration or other software. Notes created on the computer and printed in color are more memorable than hand-written notes. inspiration software allows you to translate outlines into mind maps and mind maps into outlines. Various templates are provided to graphically portray information that uses com parisonlcontrast, cause and effect, and other patterns of organization. (Inspiration is available on all computers in the TLC Computer Lab) COLORFUL LEARNING Teaching and Learning Center Tarleton State University Learning becomes easier, faster, and more enjoyable when students incorporate color into study techniques. Since color is processed largely on the right side of the brain, using colored pens and other colored study materials activates right brain functions which in turn accelerates the learning process. Furthermore, research indicates that when right-brained techniques are used, the left—brain functions (logic, math skills, analysis, writing, reading, etc.) are enhanced automatically. Consider these suggestions for making studying] learning more fun and meaningful: 0 Use colored 3-ringed notebook paper . . . Different colors for different ' courses or for different topics within a course. When studying for a test, remove only those pages from your notebook that are covered on the test. You have a psychological advantage when you see a few rather than many pages before you. The brain tells itself, "I can handle this,” whereas, it becomes overwhelmed by volumes of notes. HINT: Write on only one side of the page so that you can spread pages on your desk to see relationships of ideas. ° If you prefer, use colored 8 NZ x 11' pads of paper. Remove pages and insert into a separate two—pocket folder for each course. ° Use bright-colored two-pocket folders for keeping class notes. Choose your "favorite" colors for your “least-favorite” courses. The colors will attract you to the notes inside. Or, choose folders illustrated with symbols of your favorite sport, hobby, or interest, i.e., Sailing, football, horses, etc. 0 Use colored 3" x 5 ” index cards as flash cards to test yourself on definitions, formulas, theories, etc. Write the word on the blank side and the definition on the ruled side. Keep these in a pocket or purse to review when you have a few minutes to wait for a friend to pick you up for dinner or when you have wait time at the doctor's office or between classes. This is a helpful technique for using those "pockets of time” during which it would be troublesome to delve into a lengthy notebook. Use cards of a particular color for all information which is related or connected. For instance, write all concepts related to a partiuclar (over) 7.12c author studied in an English class on orange cards, and information about other writers on green, blue, pink, yellow, or white cards. By using colored cards to "chunk" related information, you help your brain to make that connection in a natural, easy way. ' ' Use colored pens to make mind map notes for studying. Explore different types to find out what is comfortable for you. . . medium or fine points, large-barrel or small-barrel pens, etc. Consider a set of pens with a convenient case. HINT: Select pens with free—flowing ink. Colored pencils are not as effective because the user must exert a great deal of physical pressure in writing; therefore, the hand becomes tired during long note—taking periods. This is also true of most ball—point pens. Experiment by writing with free- flowing pens, pencils, and ball point pens to compare the differences in pressure required. You will definitely feel the difference. In a long note- taking session, your fingers will not feel cramped when you use a felt tip ' or rolling ball pen which has free-flowing ink. Use file folders in a variety of colors to keep papers/ assignments organized and easily accessible. 7.12d TIPS FOR VISUAL LEARNERS Use your eyes. Make mind pictures. U56 your ability to see and imagine. Look at everything. Make lists or mind maps of things you must study. Write notes; write down homework assignments in a datebook or on a calendar. Have a notepad with you at all times. READING 1. Use sight words, flash cards, and experience stories. Do not try to sound words out; instead, try to figure if the new word has words y'Ou already know in it. For example, the work “systematic” has the word “system” within it. 2-. You are a “look and say’ ’ learner. 3. Foreign languages from an oral work standpoint will probably be difficult for you. You must §_e<_2_ the words as well as hear them pronounced. WRITING 1. "lot down “ideas as they form in your mind. 2. Brainstorm by making mind maps of your ideas. 3. Make a rough draft, skipping lines to allow room for corrections and additions. Correct. 4. Re—copy. _ 5. On essay tests, make quick mind maps or outlines on scratch paper or in the margins of the test before writing your answer. SPELLING 1. Close your eyes; see the word in your mind’s eye. 2. Visualize the word in living color. 3. Write or verbally Spell the word using your visual memory. 4. Check for accuracy. MATH 1. Visualize the problem. 2. Make pictures of the problem on scratch paper. 3. Use different colored pens to make different steps of a problem stand out one from the other. 4. Use colored pens to aid memory in recalling formulas or other pertinent information. 7.12e TIPS FOR AUDITORY LEARNERS Tune in on voices - talk to yourself - listen to yourself READING 1. Read your work aloud. 2. Use audiotapes. 3. Have someone read to you or tape information if you are not a good reader. 4. Say words silently inside your head. WRITING 1. Plan the sentence you want by saying it aloud or silently. 2. Say it several times the way you want it. 3. Write it slowly as you say it. 4. Dictate your sentence using a tape recorder and then play it back as you write it. SPELLING 1. Hear the spelling of the word. 2. Say the word and then say each letter aloud. 3. Close your eyes, spell the word, and check your Spelling. 4. Close your eyes, spell the word, and check once more. 5. Now write the word while trying to hear it in your mind. 6. Use The Bad Speller’s Dictionary by Krevishy 6c Linfield. 1. [earn your math whzle saying it aloud. Verballze each step of the problem. 2. Explain it to yourself — aloud. 3. If possible, take tests in a room alone so that you can talk out loud and “talk yourself through" the steps. 7.12f TIPS FOR TACTILE—KINESTHETIC LEARNERS Tactile—kinesthetic learners learn best through touch and through moving their bodies. They learn effectively through "hands-on” experiences and using a multi—sensory (seeing, hearing, touching, doing) approach to studying. 1. When studying, clear everything off desk except textbook, notes, or other material you need for that particular assignment. Remove everything in your visual field to eliminate distractions and to assist you to focus. 2. Cover the page you are not reading. 3. If distracted by noise, turn off radio/ TV. Wear earplugs or earphones to screen external noise. Listen to instrumental music which has 60 beats to the minute. (lhrough the Teaching and Learning Center, check out music tapes for learning and relaxing.) 4. Engage in some form of physical activity before studying ..... ..running,jogging, walking, juggling, martial arts, swimming, dancing, etc. Do any physical activity which helps balance both sides of the brain and helps the integration of the two hemispheres ..... ..walk in place and touch right hand to left knee and vice versa; do sit ups and touch left elbow to right knee and vice versa. 5. Move some part of your body while studying ....... ..knead a piece of clay; tap your foot; tape a spinner from a game set onto the table, and spin the arrow while studying; walk around the room while reading your notes; audiotape notes or the professor’s lecture, and listen to tape on a Walkman tape player with a headset while walking around the track. Use your own creative imagination to design a study technique which works for you. 6. Divide work into short study sections. After 20 minutes or when the task is completed, give yourself a reward (take a walk, have a cookie, pet the cat/ dog, etc.) 7. Use calendar to write when assignments due, when tests are scheduled, etc. 8. Sit close to front of classroom to decrease distractions. 9. Use study carrel in the library or a quiet room to study. 10. When learning the spelling of words, trace letter in the air using sweeping arm movements. Also, use fingers to trace sandpaper letters or letters made with yarn. Make raised letters using white glue; let dry; trace letters with fingers. Pour sand or salt in shallow tray or pan; draw letters with fingers. 11. When possible, use models, 3-dirnensional objects, real objects, and manipulatives. Good manipulatives are: 9 computers globes relief maps pocket-charts models calculators trays to Write in filled with sand, salt, or other material 090099 7.12g ...
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This note was uploaded on 01/16/2012 for the course AGSD 420 taught by Professor Kylemcgregor during the Spring '11 term at Tarleton.

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Tarleton Tips - NOTE-TAKlNG NUGGETS 0F WISDOM TWMUMW The...

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