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CH_20_STUDENT_OUTLINE_Spring_2011

CH_20_STUDENT_OUTLINE_Spring_2011 - Chapter 20 The...

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Chapter 20: The Diversity Protists
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What Are Protists? Mostly single-celled eukaryotes Mostly microscopic in size Use diverse modes of reproduction Asexual reproduction by mitosis Sexual reproduction using meiosis Use diverse modes of nutrition Photosynthesis (e.g. algae) Predatory (e.g. protozoans) Parasitic (e.g. protozoans) Biggest advantage of sexual reproduction? Variety and new combinations of genes.
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Protistan Reproduction and Gene Exchange Fig. 20-2
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Protist Systematics Are in Transition Genetic comparison reveals evolutionary history of organisms Genetic, instead of physical features, now separate protist species into different lineages Some physically dissimilar species are now placed in a common lineage
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The Chromists Have fine, hair-like projections of flagella Mostly single-celled but some multicellular Some are photosynthetic species Major chromist groups Water molds Diatoms Brown algae
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Chromists: Water Molds Also known as oomycetes Long filaments aggregated into cottony tufts Many are soil and water-based decomposers Profound economic impacts caused by water molds Late blight attacks potato plants (caused Irish potato famine in 1845) One species causes downy mildew (nearly destroyed French wine industry in 1870s)
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downy mildew
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Chromists: Diatoms Found in both fresh and salt water Photosynthetic Produce shells of silica that fit together Diatomaceous earth is deposits of diatom shells (mined and used as an abrasive)
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