WWII - Andrew Tran 323366 Per. #5 Group A Ch. 35: Explain...

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Andrew Tran 323366 Per. #5 Group A – Ch. 35: Explain in what way the fall of France, Hitler’s invasion of the Soviet Union, and the attack on the Pearl Harbor mark the most important turning points in American foreign policy between 1935 and 1942. America in the 1930’s was generally isolationist, as they attempted to ignore worldly issues. United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt only sought battle in order to recover from the Great Depression. As the storms of World War II thundered across Europe, Roosevelt eventually realized that the U.S. could no longer turn its back against the war. During the summer of 1933, the London Economic Conference exposed how Roosevelt’s early foreign policies were thoroughly subordinated to his plans for economic and domestic recovery. In order to prevent America from being sucked into the war, Congress passed the Neutrality Acts of 1935, 1936, and 1937. However, many laws became nullified during the war. The major turning points in American foreign policy between 1935 and 1942 (before and during WWII) was through the fall of France, which led to the nullification of the Neutrality Acts; Hitler’s invasion of the Soviet Union, which made the Neutrality Act of 1939 exempt; and the bombing of Pearl Harbor, the final spark that triggered America’s entrance into the war. If it had not been for the Axis leaders taking these actions, America would not have been thrown into the pits of
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course HIST 101 taught by Professor Wormer during the Winter '08 term at UCSD.

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WWII - Andrew Tran 323366 Per. #5 Group A Ch. 35: Explain...

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