MC_3080_Midterm_Exam_Review_Study_Slides

MC_3080_Midterm_Exam_Review_Study_Slides - General Midterm...

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General Midterm Exam Review MC 3080 The slides do not cover all of the information from the study guides. They are
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C onstitutional L aw Supremacy Clause “This Constitution , and the laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance thereof . . . shall be Supreme Law of the land ; and the Judges in every state shall be bound thereby , any thing in the Constitution or Laws of any state to the contrary notwithstanding.” -- Article VI Key Concept: limited government power
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Key Media Law Amendments Fourth Amendment “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated. . . ” Sixth Amendment “In criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury”
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Constitutional Law Important Concepts: Government Action Incorporation “No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal
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Statutory Law Congress votes on bills. State legislatures enact legislation. Municipal councils usually approve ordinances.
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Administrative Law Law made by regulatory agencies Agency Powers Quasi-Legislative PASS LAWS Quasi-Executive ENFORCE LAWS Quasi-Judicial ADJUDICATE DISPUTES.
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Administrative Law Legislative Branch: Has power through enabling legislation (Federal Communication Act of 1934 created FCC) Executive Branch Has power through appointments (President appoints the FCC Chairman) Judicial Branch Has power through through judicial review (SCOTUS reviewed FCC rules in Red Lion v. FCC )
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First Amendment: Values of Freedom of Expression Thomas I . Emerson (1963) Toward a General Theory of the First Amendment Four Values of Freedom of Expression 1. Individual Self Fulfillment 2. Attainment of Truth 3. Participating in Decision Making 4. Balance Between Stability And Change
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Prior Restraint Restrictions on expression imposed before publication or broadcast, preventing the expression from occurring. “Most odious and least tolerable infringement of freedom of expression” Imposed via censorship and licensing during the 16th Century
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Prior Restraint Near v. Minnesota (U.S.1931) Key facts: Minnesota law allowed state to enjoin publication of any periodical that typically produced “malicious,
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This note was uploaded on 01/16/2012 for the course MC 3080 taught by Professor Day during the Fall '08 term at LSU.

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MC_3080_Midterm_Exam_Review_Study_Slides - General Midterm...

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