Lab Report Cellular Respiration

Lab Report Cellular Respiration - Cellular Respiration...

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Cellular Respiration Biology 107 Kevin Ho 11/14/11
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Abstract: The cellular process of converting glucose to a form of usable energy, ATP, is called cellular respiration. The ATP created will give cells the energy to do work. This process of cellular respiration is an anaerobic progression that uses oxygen to produce ATP from specific steps. These steps include glycolysis, the Krebs cycle, and the electron transport chain. Finding the color change can be acquired by using a spectrophotometer, a device that measures the respiration rate from the color change. My hypothesis for this lab is that as the succinate amount increases, the rate of the reaction will increase as well. This can be measured by looking at the rate of DPIP being reduced over a time interval. The DPIP is found by using a calibrated spectrophotometer, which measures the amount of light absorbed. In tube 1, there is 4.4 ml of buffer, 0.3 ml of DPIP, 0.3 ml of mitochondrial suspension, and 0.0 ml of succinate. In tube 2, there is 4.3 ml of buffer, 0.3 ml of DPIP, 0.3 ml of mitochondrial suspension, and 0.1 ml of succinate. In tube 3, there is 4.2 ml of buffer, 0.3 ml of DPIP, 0.3 ml of mitochondrial suspension, and 0.2 ml of succinate. My hypothesis is supported by the results collected. In tube 1, in a 25 minute period, the absorbency went from 0.739 to 0.716. In tube 2, in a 25 minute period, the absorbency went from 0.692 to 0.458. In tube 3, in a 25 minute period, the
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Lab Report Cellular Respiration - Cellular Respiration...

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