Great Books Paper 2 Prompt 1

Great Books Paper 2 Prompt 1 - else. Orestes suffers but...

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In the Oresteia we read that ‘wisdom comes through suffering’ ( pathei mathos ). What is the relationship between wisdom and suffering in Herodotus’ Histories ? Can wisdom be learned through suffering, and can it prevent future suffering according to Herodotus? You may wish (but are not required) to address the following question as well: Whose suffering and whose wisdom are we talking about? Can one learn wisdom through another’s suffering, and can one’s wisdom prevent another’s suffering? In this regard, it may be helpful to consider the role of oracles and advisers. Croesus’s suffering. Questionable advice. Prevent Cyrus’s suffering. Peisistratus wants to be king of Athens. He tricks people of Athens to make him king three times after getting kicked out repeatedly. He dresses a girl as Athena and say Athena is bringing in new king. Parallel this to Persia. Polycrates and the fish/ring. Does prevention and advice persuade? If so does following advice prevent suffering? (Book 3.) No, because fate trumps wisdom and everything
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Unformatted text preview: else. Orestes suffers but finds wisdom in Agas death. Furies creates suffering for others. They suffer because Athena weakened their power in the court of Athens. They went from Eyrines to Eumenides. But they get wisdom because they can use their powers for good by repelling ememies from Athens. What is the relationship between wisdom and suffering in Herodotus Histories ? Can wisdom be learned through suffering, and can it prevent future suffering according to Herodotus? You may wish (but are not required) to address the following question as well: Whose suffering and whose wisdom are we talking about? Can one learn wisdom through anothers suffering, and can ones wisdom prevent anothers suffering? the two mightiest powers of the world are against you (Herodotus, Histories, 7.48) and, the land itself will become more and more hostile to you the further you advance[and] will ultimately starve you (Herodotus, Histories, 7.49)....
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This note was uploaded on 01/17/2012 for the course GTBOOKS 191 taught by Professor Cameron during the Fall '08 term at University of Michigan.

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