10 - Transforming Science Fiction into Technological...

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Alec D. Gallimore, Ph.D. Arthur F. Thurnau Professor Department of Aerospace Engineering The University of Michigan Plasmadynamics and Electric Propulsion Laboratory Transforming Science Fiction into Technological Reality for Space Travel
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1897 1865 1870
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“In some way they (the Martians) are able to generate an intense heat in a chamber of practically absolute nonconductivity….This intense heat they project in a parallel beam against any object they choose, by means of a polished parabolic mirror of unknown composition…. However it is done, it is certain that a beam of heat is the essence of the matter. What is combustible, flashes into flame at its touch, lead runs like water, it softens iron, cracks and melts glass, and when it falls upon water, that explodes into steam" H. G. Wells’ The War of the Worlds, written in 1897
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The need for speed Space travel 101 The state-of-the-art in space propulsion Analysis of three Science Fiction case studies
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THEY ARE ALL FAST! HOW FAST? 20 MPH 200 MPH 2000 MPH!
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20 MPH 200 MPH 2000 MPH! PROPULSION!
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3 entries found for propulsion. Main Entry: pro·pul·sion Pronunciation: pr&-'p&l-sh&n Function: noun Etymology: Latin propellere to propel 1 : the action or process of propelling 2 : something that propels PROPULSION
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RUNNING <25 MPH STEAM POWER <65 MPH ANIMAL POWER <40 MPH PISTON AIRPLANES <500 MPH JET AIRPLANES <2500 MPH HOW CAN WE GO EVEN FASTER? CAR ENGINES <300 MPH BRIEF HISTORY OF PROPULSION
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Combustion Chamber Throat Nozzle HOT! Propellant HOT! Thrust - newtons or pounds Exhaust velocity (Isp) - m/s or mph Mass flow rate - kg/s or lb/s Power - watts or hp Flight velocity ( ! V) - m/s or mph Acceleration - m/s 2 or g’s fuel oxidizer HOT!! ROCKET PROPULSION
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Thrust - newtons or pounds Exhaust velocity (Isp) - m/s or mph Mass flow rate - kg/s or lb/s Power - watts or hp Flight velocity ( ! V) - m/s or mph Acceleration - m/s 2 or g’s fuel oxidizer HOT!!
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This note was uploaded on 01/17/2012 for the course ENGR 110 taught by Professor None during the Fall '08 term at University of Michigan.

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10 - Transforming Science Fiction into Technological...

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