GEOG 330 Chapter 1 - 1/1 GEOG 330 INTRODUCTION TO REMOTE SENSING Ch 1 Introduction to Remote Sensing of the Environment What is remote sensing

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
GEOG 330 INTRODUCTION TO REMOTE SENSING Ch 1 Introduction to Remote Sensing of the Environment 1/1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
What is remote sensing? Remote sensing (RS) is… • = “The measurement or acquisition of information of some property of an object or phenomenon, by a recording device that is not in physical or intimate contact with the object or phenomenon under study” (ASPRS, 1983) • = “Acquisition of information about the condition and/or the state of a target by a sensor that is not in direct physical contact with it” (Asrar, 1989)
Background image of page 2
But where did the term come from? • The actual term of RS was coined by geographers at the Office of Naval Research in the early 1960s • Research team led by Evelyn L. Pruitt argued that the prefix “photo” was being stretched too thin. • For example, Pruitt pointed to the following: • “Photograph” did not cover regions of the electromagnetic spectrum outside the visible range • “Aerial” was too limited because of the potential of seeing Earth from space
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Refining the definition… Maximal definition: “Remote sensing is the acquiring of data about an object without touching it” (Jensen, 2007:4)
Background image of page 4
Remote Sensing is Dynamic
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
What is remote sensing? • The three components of RS include: Target • Sensor • Collection of information & inference of target properties
Background image of page 6
How does RS fit in with the field of geography? Three-way model of interaction between Remote Sensing (RS), Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and Cartography/Surveying as being used in physical, biological, and social sciences (Dahlberg and Jensen 1986)
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Remote Sensing Process
Background image of page 8
2. Data Collection In situ data collection RS data collection The Remote Sensing Process
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2. Data Collection In situ data collection— RS data collection— The Remote Sensing Process Disadvantages : • Intrusive • Sampling bias due to differences in collection methods • Time consuming and limited to small areas Advantages : • Used to calibrate RS • Independent accuracy assessment of RS results Advantages : • Unobtrusive (passive sensors) • Systematic data collection reduces bias • Provide biophysical data over wide areas Disadvantages : • Intrusive (active sensors) • Uncalibrated sensor • Expensive and difficult to obtain • NOT a Panacea
Background image of page 10
Remote Sensing Components 1. The target , which can be an object or the geographic extent of a phenomenon, can be investigated through the electromagnetic radiation that it emits or reflects 2. The sensor is the instrument used to record the electromagnetic radiation (EMR) coming from the target 3. Acquisition and inference are the process of collecting the EMR coming from the target at the speed of light and turning this energy measurement into information using visual and/or digital image processing techniques The Remote Sensing Process 2. Data Collection
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Remote Sensing Systems Passive sensors collect naturally occurring EMR that is reflected or emitted from the terrain Passive sensors
Background image of page 12
Image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/16/2012 for the course GEOG 330 taught by Professor Marsh during the Fall '07 term at University of Arizona- Tucson.

Page1 / 51

GEOG 330 Chapter 1 - 1/1 GEOG 330 INTRODUCTION TO REMOTE SENSING Ch 1 Introduction to Remote Sensing of the Environment What is remote sensing

This preview shows document pages 1 - 13. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online