3rd part Cpt 1 and Cpt 2 Solomons

3rd part Cpt 1 and Cpt 2 Solomons - 17....

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Ch. 1 - 17. How to Interpret and Write Structural Formulas
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Ch. 1 - 17A.  17A.  Dash Structural Formulas Dash Structural Formulas Atoms joined by single bonds can  rotate relatively freely with respect to  one another H C H C H C O H H H H H H C H C H C H H O H H H H C H C H C O H H H H H Equivalent dash formulas for propyl alcohol
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Ch. 1 - 7B.  Condensed Structural Formulas Condensed Structural Formulas
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Ch. 1 - 17C.  17C.  Bond-Line Formulas Bond-Line Formulas
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Ch. 1 -
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Ch. 1 - 17D.  17D.  Three-Dimensional Formulas Three-Dimensional Formulas C C H H H H H H OR C C H H H H H H etc. Ethane OR etc. H Br C H H H C Br H H Br H C H H OR Bromomethane
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Ch. 1 - Examples of bond-line formulas that include  three-dimensional representations OH H H Br H Cl NH 2 H HO H Br An example involving trigonal planar geometry An example involving linear geometry
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Created by Professor William Tam & Dr. Phillis Chang Ch. 2 - Chapter 2 Chapter 2 Families of Carbon Families of Carbon Compounds Compounds Functional Groups, Intermolecular Forces, & Infrared (IR) Spectroscopy
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Ch. 2 - 1. Hydrocarbons Hydrocarbons  are compounds that  contain only  carbon  and  hydrogen   atoms Alk ane s hydrocarbons that do not have  multiple bonds between carbon  atoms pent ane cyclohex e.g.
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Ch. 2 -  Alk ene s contain at least one carbon–carbon double bond prop ene cyclohex e.g.
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Ch. 2 -  Alk yne s contain at least one carbon–carbon triple bond eth yne 1-pent yne e.g. C C H H 2-pent yne
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Ch. 2 -  Aromatic compound contain a special type of ring,  the most common example of  which is a benzene ring benzene toluene e.g. benzoic acid CH 3 COOH
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Ch. 2 -  1A. 1A. Alkanes Alkanes The primary sources of alkanes are natural gas  and  petroleum The smaller alkanes (methane through  butane) are gases under ambient conditions Methane  is the principal component of  natural gas Higher molecular weight alkanes are  obtained largely by refining petroleum H H H H Methane
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Ch. 2 -  1B. 1B. Alkenes Alkenes Ethene and propene, the two simplest  alkenes, are among the most important  industrial chemicals produced in the United  States Ethene  is used as a starting material for the  synthesis of many industrial compounds,  including  ethanol ethylene oxide ethanal and the polymer  polyethylene C C H H H H Ethene
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Ch. 2 -  1C. 1C. Alkynes Alkynes The simplest alkyne is ethyne (also called  acetylene) Examples of naturally occurring alkynes C C H H C O C C C C CH 3 Capillin (an antifungal agent) O Br Cl Br Dactylyne (an inhibitor of pentobarbital metabolism)
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Ch. 2 -  1D.
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This note was uploaded on 01/16/2012 for the course PSYCH 373 taught by Professor Marthafaircloth during the Spring '09 term at Campbell.

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3rd part Cpt 1 and Cpt 2 Solomons - 17....

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