Wilderness First Aid

Wilderness First Aid - Wilderness First Aid Basic...

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Wilderness First Aid
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Basic Essentials Hat Sunscreen Insect Repellant Boots Long pants (long sleeves) Rain gear Meat Tenderizer
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Hydration Did you know that if you're thirsty, you're already partially dehydrated?   Drink to prevent thirst, not to quench it.
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Heat Cramps: brief but painful involuntary muscle spasms. They usually occur in the muscles being used during the exercise, and are a result of insufficient liquid intake Heat Exhaustion: difficulty breathing, headache, feeling hot on head and neck, dizziness, heat cramps, chills, nausea, irritability, vomiting, extreme weakness or fatigue Heatstroke: rapid and shallow breathing, rapid heartbeat, unusually high or low blood pressure, lack of sweating, mental confusion and disorientation, unconsciousness, physical collapse
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Heat Exhaustion stop the activity, move into a cool environment, remove excess clothing drink hydrating liquids (NOT coffee, tea, sodas or juice!).
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ABC's and other Acronyms ABCD: First steps in assessing a victim for life threatening conditions. Sometimes E is added, for Exposure and Exam. A Airway open? B Breathing? C Circulation (pulse, major bleeding, and skin condition) D Disability?
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RAP ABC: Sequence of action for starting adult CPR Survey the Scene First R Responsive? A Activate EMS P Position victim on back A Airway open? B Breathing C Circulation (pulse)?
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LAF: Procedure used to determine injuries L Look at the area for deformity, open wounds, swelling A and F Feel for deformity, tenderness, swelling
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DOTS: Sign of injury D Deformity O Open Wounds T Tenderness S Swelling
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What Is the Difference Between a Sprain and a Strain? A sprain is an injury to a ligament--a stretching or a tearing. One or more ligaments can be injured during a sprain. The severity of the injury will depend on the extent of injury to a single ligament (whether the tear is partial or complete) and the number of ligaments involved. A strain is an injury to either a muscle or a tendon. Depending on the severity of the injury, a strain may be a simple overstretch of the muscle or tendon, or it can result in a partial or complete tear. Sprains and Strains
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What Are the Signs and Symptoms of a Strain? Typically, people with a strain experience pain, muscle spasm, and muscle weakness. They can also have localized swelling, cramping, or inflammation and, with a minor or moderate strain, usually some loss of muscle function. Patients typically have pain in the injured area and general weakness of the muscle when they attempt to move it. Severe strains that partially or completely tear the muscle or tendon are often very painful and disabling.
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RICE Therapy Rest Reduce regular exercise or activities of daily living as needed. Your doctor may advise you to put no weight on an injured area for 48 hours. If you cannot put weight on an ankle or knee, crutches may help. If you use a cane or one crutch
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Wilderness First Aid - Wilderness First Aid Basic...

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