Ch. 30 Presentation

Ch. 30 Presentation - Chapter 30 How Animals Move Skeletons...

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Chapter 30 How Animals Move Skeletons provide body support, movement by working with muscles, and protection of internal organs. There are three main types of animal skeletons: hydrostatic skeletons, exoskeletons, and endoskeletons. © 2012 Parson Education, Inc.
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1. Hydrostatic skeletons are fluid held under pressure in a closed body compartment and found in worms and cnidarians. Hydrostatic skeletons help protect other body parts by cushioning them from shocks, give the body shape, and provide support for muscle action. 30.2 Skeletons function in support, movement, and protection © 2012 Parson Education, Inc.
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Figure 30.2A
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2. Exoskeletons are rigid external skeletons that consist of chitin and protein in arthropods and calcium carbonate shells in molluscs. Exoskeletons in arthropods must be shed to permit growth. 30.2 Skeletons function in support, movement, and protection © 2012 Parson Education, Inc.
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Figure 30.2B
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Figure 30.2C Shell (exoskeleton) Mantle
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3. Endoskeletons consist of hard or leathery supporting elements situated among the soft tissues of an animal. They may be made of cartilage or cartilage and bone (vertebrates),or
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