2.Pollination

2.Pollination - Pollination Biology or Ecology Including...

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Pollination Biology or Ecology Including examples from local flora and David Attenborough’s Private Life of Plants
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Abiotic Pollination - uses a nonliving vector - Usually considered to be a metabolically wasteful process Two types: 1. Anemophily- “wind lover”= wind pollination 2. Hydrophily- “water lover” = water pollination
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Anemophily -major type of abiotic pollination Usual Floral Morphology -incomplete flowers that often lack perianth -color and scent lacking -flowers in inflorescences elevated above the vegetation -flowers often open before leaves are produced -large quantities of smooth, dry pollen produced
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Anemophily is common in many families: Poaceae Page 1223 of SMIFNCT -inflorescence-spike or panicle, spikelet, glumes, floret, lemma, and palea
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Pg 78 and 81 SMIFNCT -color photographs showing grass stamens with two florets in spikelets arranged in spike-like branches
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Trees with catkins illustrated in SMIFNCT: Fagaceae Pg. 721 monoecious Juglandaceae Pg. 751 monoecious Salicaceae Pg 981 dioecious
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Hydrophily -rarer type of abiotic pollination Usual Floral Morphology -color and scent lacking -perianth reduced -pollen often floats or have filaments in submerged species that act like grappling hooks
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Example of Families with Hydrophily Ceratophyllaceae (Coon-tail) Pg 529-530 SMIFNCT -mostly asexually reproduces by fragmentation -during sexual reproduction, anthers break off and float to surface releasing pollen that sinks to the female flowers that grow under the water -rare pollination in one of the most primitive groups magnoliophytes
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Ceratophyllum demersum with underwater female flowers. Photo from Plants of the Coastal Bend by Roy Lehman, Ruth O’Brien, and Tammy White
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Hydrocharitaceae (Waterweed) Pgs 1166- 1172 SMIFNCT Vallisnera (ribbonweed) or Egeria (Elodea is used as common name but is actually genus name of another plant that does not occur in Texas) -common aquarium plants introduced into streams and lakes of Cross Timbers. Vallisnera is native in some E and SE Texas waters -Female flowers float on surface and male flowers break off at surface (great fish food) and float to female. Once pollinated long peduncles recoil pulling flowers underwater to form fruits Example of Families with Hydrophily
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http://plants.usda.gov/ Egeria densa
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iotic Pollination o-evolution between plant and animal based on mutual benefit utualism) or where the plant benefits and animal is harmed arasitism or deceit pollination) utualistic relationships based on three major rewards to animals Pollen aple food for insects like beetles ten gathered by adults and fed to larval insects Nectar gar solutions tailored to particular insect needs Oils ch energy source or used to make phermones used in insect sex
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This note was uploaded on 01/16/2012 for the course BIOL 3154 taught by Professor Allannelson during the Spring '11 term at Tarleton.

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2.Pollination - Pollination Biology or Ecology Including...

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