Philosophy Aquinas

Philosophy Aquinas - Lee Ruth Lee Introduction to...

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Unformatted text preview: Lee Ruth Lee Introduction to Philosophy Professor Martin Bunzl October 5, 2011 Aquinas Second Argument Aquinas second argument is that there is a first efficient cause which he determines to be God. He says that there is cause in the world and that nothing can cause itself since There is no case known in which a thing is found to be the efficient cause of itself; for so it would be prior to itself, which is impossible (Aquinas 1). A cause cannot cause itself (because then it would have to exist before causing itself) so there also cannot be an infinite cycle of causation, which would ultimately be an absurd concept. Consequently, he concludes that God must be the first cause the ultimate cause by proposing the self-evident premise that there must be a first cause by saying, if in efficient causes it is possible to go on to infinity, there will be no first efficient cause, neither will there be an ultimate effect, nor any intermediate efficient causes; all of which...
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Philosophy Aquinas - Lee Ruth Lee Introduction to...

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