Playing for Time Essay

Playing for Time Essay - Christine Van Pelt - 05 Holding on...

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Holding on to Strength In the book Playing for Time , Fania Fénelon writes about her time in the concentration camps Auschwitz-Birkenau and Bergen-Belsen. As the war is became more advanced, the Nazis took all of the Jews to the camps. With Fania being half-Jewish and helping the resistance by being a messenger and letting members sleep in her home, her life goes from a Parisian singer to a member in the orchestra at the Auschwitz concentration camp in the early 1940s. The leaders of the camp kept the members of the camp in fear of their lives ending at any second causing Fania and others to only rebel with little comments towards camp leaders and thoughts of justice soon prevailing, but rebelliousness was found in two young souls. The environment of the camp was one that took much of the women’s humanity and strength and enforced fear in them to keep them from rebelling. Soon after arriving to camp, Fania was able to join the orchestra with her musical talent and background and receive slightly better treatment than the regular campers. Moments after she got there, she was able to grasp that life was treated without dignity, and she “felt as if she had arrived in a different world where there wasn’t a balance of justice.” 1 Fania thought she was in an inhumane world where “there was no longer either code or law” and that they had “arrived at the journey’s end: hell.” 2 Leaders would point out the campers and send them there without a moment of hesitation, and they wouldn’t be held responsible for the death. The officers used this control plus decreased food rations to make sure they were obedient. This drained life out of the orchestra members and especially the campers who worked outside. Fania knew that normally “to look outside is to look at life, but here it was to look at death.” 3 She found it hard to play for the leaders who were apart of creating this. Every woman in the orchestra had to battle accepting this evil or not. Some of this changed the girls for the worse, and they suffered “a type of character leprosy: bits of oneself rooted and fell off without one’s even knowing they are gone.” 4 Finding strength to fight it was 1 Fenelon, Fania, and Marcelle Routier. ́ Playing for Time . Trans. Judith Landry. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse UP, 1997. Print. Page 20. 2 Fenelon, Fania, and Marcelle Routier. ́ Playing for Time . Trans. Judith Landry. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse UP, 1997. Print. Page 21. 3 Fenelon, Fania, and Marcelle Routier. ́ Playing for Time . Trans. Judith Landry. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse UP, 1997. Print. Page 48. 4 Fenelon, Fania, and Marcelle Routier. ́ Playing for Time . Trans. Judith Landry. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse UP, 1997. Print. Page 106.
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Playing for Time Essay - Christine Van Pelt - 05 Holding on...

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