Chapter 6 Music Review

Chapter 6 Music Review - Chapter 6 Timbre Goals for this...

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Chapter 6 Timbre Goals for this chapter To understand the concept of timbre To learn how different timbres are produced To become familiar with the different types of voices To meet the musical instruments and the timbres they produce To understand how vocal and instrumental timbres are related To recognize timbre as a basic building block of music To understand the use of original instruments in many classical performances Music discussed in this chapter Verdi – O tello What to Listen For: The strongly contrasting timbres of the tenor and soprano voice, and the way that Verdi uses them to draw contrasts between the characters but also to unite them Berlioz - Roméo et Juliette What to Listen For: The rich sonority of the low female voice is highlighted by the sparse accompaniment. What to Listen For: The use of the choir as narrator results in some unusual choral sonorities with minimal orchestral accompaniment. What to Listen For: The full lyrical potential of the cellos is heard in this scene. Bach - Concerto in D minor Domine Deus, rex coelestis from Bach's Mass in B minor. What to Listen For: The contrast in timbre between the soprano and tenor voices, and the ways in which they interact with the accompaniment Mozart - Symphony no. 40 Debussy - Sonata for flute, viola and harp Smetana- Šárka Mozart – Partita Bach - Quoniam tu solus sanctus Gould - An American Salute 1
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Dallapiccola - Canti di Prigonia Wayang- Sukawati (Sulendro) Haydn - String Quartet in B-flat major Vandervelde - Genesis II Stravinsky - Symphony of Psalms Crumb - Black Angels Sousa: The Stars and Stripes Forever! What to Listen For: The sectional structure of the march; the famous piccolo solo, which is heard during the final statements of the alternate section Timbre o refers to the sound quality or tone color of a musical instrument or voice. o To put it another way, the melody may change and become louder, but we can still recognize a saxophone’s mellow tone, a guitar’s buzz, or a singer’s very special voice. All of this makes timbre one of the most interesting and flexible means of musical expression. o a basic building block of music o performers can change the timbre of the sounds they produce in a wide variety of ways, both conscious and unconscious. pitch o its highness or lowness and its volume, timbre is what is left. What composers and performers do with timbre, or tone color, is often compared directly to the use of color by painters Violin o the most prominent instrument in the symphony orchestra o the sound is produced by strings, and it is then reinforced by the hollow, wooden body of the instrument. o
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This note was uploaded on 01/17/2012 for the course MUS 1220 taught by Professor Mathis during the Spring '08 term at Baylor.

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Chapter 6 Music Review - Chapter 6 Timbre Goals for this...

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