An Introduction to the Toulmin Analysis

An Introduction to the Toulmin Analysis - Read Lecture 3,...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Read Lecture 3, An Introduction to Toulmin Analysis, on the Bb website under Lectures. Logos comes from logic and is something we evaluate when we analyze argument A method to look for analyzing logic of arguments is to look for an argument’s anthymeme The enthymeme is this set of information: 1. The claim (what the writer is trying to get you to believe) 2. The reason (could be more than one for the claim) 3. The unstated assumption (could be more than one) Toulmin’s Model of Analysis 1. Claim is a writer’s central point (an arguable statement) a. Subclaims are minor arguable points that support the central point 2. Reasons are main supports offered for the claim (subclaims) 3. Grounds is proof that the reason is true and correct 4. Warrants (most important part of an argument) is the unstated assumption upon which an argument depends. A warrant must be a general principle and a listener must share the speaker’s warrants so the argument will not fail. Note: Warrants may or may not be true
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/17/2012 for the course ENG 2304 taught by Professor Allman during the Spring '09 term at Baylor.

Page1 / 2

An Introduction to the Toulmin Analysis - Read Lecture 3,...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online