Renewable & Non-Renewable Energy Week 11

Renewable & Non-Renewable Energy Week 11 -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
Renewable energy is energy which comes from natural resources such as sunlight, wind, rain, tides, and geothermal heat, which are renewable (naturally replenished). In 2006, about 18% of global final energy consumption came from renewables, with 13% coming from traditional biomass, which is mainly used for heating, and 3% from hydroelectricity. New renewables (small hydro, modern biomass, wind, solar, geothermal, and biofuels) accounted for another 2.4% and are growing very rapidly. The share of renewables in electricity generation is around 18%, with 15% of global electricity coming from hydroelectricity and 3.4% from new renewable. Wind power is widely used in Europe, Asia & U.S.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Geothermal roots from Greek, where geo means Earth and thermos meaning heat. Geothermal power is cost effective, reliable, sustainable, and environmentally friendly, but has historically been limited to areas near tectonic plate boundaries. Advantages of Geothermal Energy: Low costs Consumes less electricity More efficiency than gas and oil furnaces A highly acceptable solution as greenhouse gases and air pollutants levels are less Cools and operates quietly Disadvantages of Geothermal Energy: High installation costs Requires lots of space Needs a bedrock base Installation is tricky
Background image of page 4
Tidal energy is a hydropower which converts the energy of tides into electricity or other useful forms of power. Although not yet widely used, tidal power has potential for future electricity generation. Tides are more predictable than wind energy and solar power. Among sources of renewable energy, tidal power has traditionally suffered from relatively high cost and limited availability of sites with sufficiently high tidal ranges or flow velocities, thus constricting its total availability. Advantages of Tidal Energy:
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 6
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/17/2012 for the course MASS COMMU 107 taught by Professor Masror during the Spring '11 term at College of E&ME, NUST.

Page1 / 12

Renewable & Non-Renewable Energy Week 11 -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online