How Airplanes Fly - How Airplanes Fly? By Tooba Khan

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Unformatted text preview: How Airplanes Fly? By Tooba Khan http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bv3m Airplanes fly when the movement of air across their wings creates an upward force on the wings (and thus the rest of the plane) that is greater than the force of gravity pulling the plane toward the earth. Bernoulli’s Principal Bernoulli discovered that the pressure exerted by a moving fluid is inversely proportional to the speed of the fluid. In other words, fluid pressure decreases as fluid speed increases, and vice versa. Application of Bernoulli’s Principal on Flight The same principle applies to moving air. The faster that air moves through a space, the lower the air pressure; the slower it moves, the higher the pressure. Aircraft wings are designed to take advantage of that fact and create the lift force necessary to overcome the weight of the aircraft, and get airplanes off the ground. The air going over the top moves faster than the air going underneath, and the air pressure above the wing thus is lower than it is under the wing. The pressure differential creates lift, and the faster the wing moves through the air, the greater the lift becomes, eventually overcoming the force of gravity upon the aircraft. Aerodynamic Forces Four Aerodynamic forces act on planes during flight. Drag: The resistance of the air (Backward Force) Thrust: Power of airplane’s engine (Forward Force) Lift: Force generated by the wings during flight (Upward Force) Gravity: Natural force acting upon the airplane (Downward Force) Drag opposes thrust and lift opposes gravity. So for airplanes to fly, the thrust must be greater than the drag and the lift must be ...
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This note was uploaded on 01/17/2012 for the course MASS COMMU 107 taught by Professor Masror during the Spring '11 term at College of E&ME, NUST.

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How Airplanes Fly - How Airplanes Fly? By Tooba Khan

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