Robert Louis Stevenson in The Strange Case of D1

Robert Louis Stevenson in The Strange Case of D1 - 230...

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230 English 101 5/13/06 Knowledge, Fear, and Duality Have you ever wanted to become someone or something other than your self? In The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, by Robert Louis Stevenson, a very reputable doctor’s curiosity gets the best of him. The protagonist Dr. Hennery Jekyll performs very controversial moral experiments upon him-self, which transform him into an opposite of Dr. Jekyll, Mr. Hyde. Robert Louis Stevenson is telling us in his book The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde that we fear the knowledge of our duality so we keep silent. We are afraid of the truth, about ourselves, so we stay quiet. Everyone has a part of himself or herself that they don’t reveal to anyone. We are afraid to show it but when it comes out we’d rather not talk about it. The most significant elements of literature employed in this book are knowledge, fear, and duality. Robert Louis Stevenson uses knowledge as a very important element. Nearly everyone mentioned in the book showed characteristics of knowledge and are reputation. “Now I shall know you again, said Mr. Utterson. It may be useful.” This quote is said when Mr. Utterson meets Mr. Hyde for the first time. This
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Robert Louis Stevenson in The Strange Case of D1 - 230...

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