{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

English 112 paper - Falvo 1 Elisa Falvo Professor Calhoun...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Falvo 1 Elisa Falvo Professor Calhoun English 112 3 March 2009 Gilead Gender “Gender equality is more than a goal in itself. It is a precondition for meeting the challenge of reducing poverty, promoting sustainable development and building good governance” (Unkown). Unfortunately, in the novel, The Handmaid’s Tale , the Gilead society lacks gender equality. Instead, in this patriarchal society, authority figures try to force woman into fulfilling traditional gender roles. For example, the women are forced to cook, clean, and have babies. The author, Margaret Atwood, uses this idea to contrast this civilization against modern day society in the United States. More specifically, women are forced to abide by men; therefore, they lose all of their freedoms to portray their own gender characteristics. In fact, due to the strict gender codes in the town of Gilead, portrayed by the novel, women lose flexibility in expressing themselves. In Gilead, there is only one way to discuss one’s gender. As a result, this controlled society prevents women from expressing themselves through their own personal preferences when it comes to gender roles. Throughout the book, the author points out a clear reason why the society is based around a common goal to produce children. By limiting forcing one characteristic for women the government can better control women. In order to prove the importance of gender individuality among modern day society, Margaret Atwood argues that when women are forced to follow strict gender personas, negative consequences occur.
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
2 In today’s world, many women express their gender through outward appearance. However, in the book, A Handmaid’s Tale , authority figures force the women of Gilead to dress and look a certain way. At the beginning of the story, Atwood depicts the visual appearances of these women. She explains that there are four basic types of roles for women. Depending on their role, they must dress appropriately.
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern