Chapter 06 test slides

Chapter 06 test slides - Perception Perception is the...

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Perception Perception   is the process of selecting, organizing, and  interpreting sensory information.   Perception   enables us to recognize meaningful objects  and events. Perception   depends on learning, context, and culture.   Perception  is influenced by experience. 9
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Bottom-up  and Top-down Processing An analysis of a stimulus (e.g., a sound)  begins with  our sense receptors  and “ works its way up”  to the  level of the brain and mind.  This is called   bottom-up  processing.   Bottom-up processing  starts at entry  level and works up to the brain.   Top-down processing  starts at the brain .  It is   information processing using higher-level mental  processes, as  we construct perceptions .   We draw on  our  experiences  and  expectations  (from our own  brain).   Perception involves top-down processing. 10
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Selective Attention Selective attention  is the focusing on only one particular stimulus at  a time.   It determines which stimulus we will perceive.  We can  selectively attend with each of our senses. Perceptions about objects  change from moment to moment.  For example, we can perceive different forms of the Necker cube.   However,  we can only pay attention to one aspect of the object at a  time.   If you stare at the cube, you may notice that it reverses location.  11 Necker Cube
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Selective Attention   Purpose :  Selective attention prevents us from  becoming overwhelmed by the large number  of stimuli that bombard us at any one time. Disadvantage :  Selective attention  limits   our  perception  because many stimuli go by  unnoticed.   Even if a stimulus figure can evoke more than  one perception,  we can only experience one  at a time. 12
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Inattentional Blindness Inattentional blindness  refers to our inability to see an  object or a person in our midst.   Simmons and Chabris (1999) showed that, when viewers  were asked to count basketball passes in a filmed game,  half  of the viewers  failed to see  the gorilla-suited person walk  through the play area.   When attending to one task, we may fail to notice other  stimuli.  Ex: Using a cell phone  while driving, we  don’t see the stop sign  and drive through it.  14
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Change Blindness Change blindness   is a form of  inattentional blindness.   In an  experiment, a person (wearing glasses) was asked directions.  Two experimenters pass between them carrying a door.  Two- thirds of the participants in the study who were giving  directions failed to notice a  change   in the individual asking  for directions.   The new person was also wearing different  clothes.   15 © 1998 Psychonomic Society Inc. Image provided courtesy of Daniel J. Simmons.
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This note was uploaded on 01/18/2012 for the course PSY 205 taught by Professor Palfai during the Fall '08 term at Syracuse.

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Chapter 06 test slides - Perception Perception is the...

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