Chapter 07 test slides

Chapter 07 test slides - States of Consciousness What is...

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5 States of Consciousness What is consciousness? Consciousness   is an awareness of our environment  and ourselves.   It includes our awareness of stimuli in the external  environment, as well as awareness of our own  internal events  (e.g., what we are thinking; how fast  is our heart is beating; if we are in pain).
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8 The  unconscious mind  processes information in  parallel  or  simultaneously  on multiple tracks.  It is  fast  and has a  large  capacity .  It occurs  automatically .   The  conscious mind  processes information  sequentially .  It  is  slow  and has  limited capacity .  We can exert  voluntary  control  over it.  The conscious mind is  easier to  communicate to others.      Information processing      occurs on many levels      depending on:      1.  difficulty of task       2.  familiarity of task    Conscious mind Unconscious mind
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States of Consciousness Active state of consciousness  involves controlled or  heightened awareness  of the environment or self (e.g.,  planning, decision-making, responses to decisions). Passive state of consciousness  involves  minimal  awareness  of the environment or self (e.g.,  daydreaming, sleeping). Altered state of consciousness  involves a  significant  change  in the content or quality of consciousness (e.g.,  deep sleep, dreams, meditation, drugs).  9
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4 Rhythm of Sleep Circadian rhythm  is a person’s daily sleep and wake cycle.    It is the strongest of all the rhythms.  Circadian rhythm  occurs on a 24-hour cycle and includes sleeping and  wakefulness.   It is disrupted during transcontinental flights  and we then experience “jet lag.” Melatonin is a sleep-inducing hormone.  Light  triggers the  suprachiasmatic nucleus to  decrease melatonin  from the pineal gland  (in the morning) and increase it in the evening.              16 Illustration © Cynthia Turner 2003
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External cues can influence circadian rhythms,  such  as light and darkness, high activity level, caffeine, etc. High point of wakefulness is related to increased  body temperature.   Vision, hearing, smell, taste, and  alertness are all at their peak   at our high point of  wakefulness. Low point of wakefulness is related to decreased body  temperature and increased sleepiness. Thinking is sharpest and memory is most accurate  when people are at their daily peak in circadian  arousal. 17
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This note was uploaded on 01/18/2012 for the course PSY 205 taught by Professor Palfai during the Fall '08 term at Syracuse.

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Chapter 07 test slides - States of Consciousness What is...

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