Chapter 14 test slides

Chapter 14 test slides - Various psychological states can...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
5 Stress Various psychological states can cause physical illness.    Stress   is any circumstance  (real or perceived)  that threatens a  person’s well-being.   Stress  is the process during which we  perceive and respond to certain events (called stressors).   We appraise these stressors as challenging or threatening  to us. When we feel severe stress, our ability to cope  with it is impaired. L e S t o n / C r b i s
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
9 Stress can be adaptive.   In a fearful or stress-producing situation, we can run  away and save our lives.   Stress can be maladaptive.  If it is prolonged (chronic stress), it increases our risk  of illness and health problems. Stress and Illness
Background image of page 2
10 Stress and Stressors Stress is a slippery concept.   It can be either a  stimulus, or a response, or a process.    At times, it is the  stimulus  (e.g., missing an  appointment). At other times, it is the  response  (e.g., sweating while  taking a test). Finally, it can be a  process  by which we appraise and  cope with environmental threats and challenges (e.g.,   going through a move to a new city can be a  “stressful  process”).
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
11 Stress and Stressors Stress is not just a stimulus or a response.  It is also a  process by which we appraise and cope with  environmental threats and challenges.    How we  appraise  an event influences how much stress we  experience and how effectively we respond.   When short-lived or taken as a challenge, stressors may  have positive effects.  However, if stress is prolonged or  threatening, it can be harmful. B o b D a e m r i c h / T I g W k s
Background image of page 4
The Stress Response System Our body responds to stress with a  two-track stress  response system  involving the: 1 . sympathetic nervous system  - triggers the  release of epinephrine and norepineprine. 2 . cerebral cortex  – orchestrates the release of  glucocorticoids. Both systems trigger the “fight-or-flight”  response,  which causes physiological changes in  our body, such as tense muscles, faster breathing  increased blood pressure. 12
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
13  Two-track Stress Response System 1. Sympathetic Nervous System  Canon proposed that the stress  response  (occurring fast)  was a  “fight-or-flight”  response prompted  by the sympathetic nervous system.  The sympathetic nervous system  releases stress hormones,  epinephrine  and  norepinephrine  ,  from the inner part of the adrenal  glands.  It causes an increase in heart  and respiration rates, mobilization of  sugar and fat, and the dulling of pain.    This is a very fast process.
Background image of page 6
14 Two-track Stress Response System  2. Cerebral Cortex The cerebral cortex  perceives a stressor. 
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 28

Chapter 14 test slides - Various psychological states can...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online