The Politics of Staring

The Politics of Staring - Andrew Lazarow The Politics of...

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Andrew Lazarow The Politics of Staring: Visual Rhetorics of Disability in Popular Photography is written by Rosemarie Garland-Thompson who addresses the way in which American culture views disabled people. Rosemarie discusses how in America’s past disabled people were viewed as different, but in more recent years the advancement in photography has enabled people with disabilities to feel as if they are part of the ordinary world. Rosemarie defends her pitch by explaining the four primary visual rhetorics of disability. According to Rosemarie’s essay, these visual rhetorics are wondrous, sentimental, exotic and realism. Through photography these visual rhetorics have helped, but not solved the problem of being viewed differently. The first rhetoric Rosemarie explains is wondrous by using the example of Charles Trip. Trip is in a picture with a completely normal setting; he is sitting in a chair next to a set table. The catch to the picture is Trip has no hands and is using his feet to eat. This causes people to see
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This note was uploaded on 01/18/2012 for the course WRT 105 taught by Professor Kleinbart during the Spring '07 term at Syracuse.

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The Politics of Staring - Andrew Lazarow The Politics of...

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