biodiversity - Econ 325 In-Class Work The Economics of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Econ 325 In-Class Work The Economics of Biodiversity: Extinction and Conservation Biodiversity – a shortened term for Biological Diversity – is a general concept used to characterize the number, variety, and variability of living organisms in a given grouping or area. The term biodiversity can be used to describe various levels of biological organization, including genetic diversity, species diversity, and ecosystem diversity. Extinction is the dying out of a given species or group of species, and directly leads to the loss of biodiversity in all levels. Extinction may be naturally occurring or human-induced (anthropogenic). Projections of species loss over the next century range from 20 to 50 percent of the world’s total species availability (note: their is much uncertainty regarding how many species actually exist currently or have ever existed). This rate of loss is between 1,000 and 10,000 times the historical rate of extinction. Causes of anthropogenic biodiversity loss
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 4

biodiversity - Econ 325 In-Class Work The Economics of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online