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A quick film overview

A quick film overview - A quick film overview Invention...

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A quick film overview - Invention pre-1901 - Early film era 1902-1915 - Silent Film era 1915-1929 What we talk about when we talk about film - Industry o Production, distribution, exhibition o Structure and organization o People and developments - Style o Content and messages o Innovations o People and titles Invention and development - Illusion of motion o Persistence of vision (flip book) Psi effect (driving past Christmas lights, looks like motion) o Eadweard Muybridge and the racehorse Tried to figure out if a horse ever had all feet on the ground when running If we have enough pictures that are still, we have movement - Inventing the actual film (stock) o George Eastman: invented roll film o Hannibal Goodwin: celluloid - Inventing projection (Thomas Edison) o Kinetoscope Individual viewing cabinets Shorts film strips Play films but only one person can view it - Lumiere brothers o Projection, projected first film in 1895 o Audience of many - Vitascope o Projection o Long celluloid strips o Can combine projections and have longer reels - Exhibition & vaudeville (variety shows) - Novelty style Early Film
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- Film Style o Films tell stories Georges Melies, A trip to the Moon (1902) - American Director o Edwin S. Porter The Life of an American fireman (1902); The Great Train Robbery (1903) - Style and Culture o Vaudeville tradition o Working Classes and immigrants - Exhibition o Nickelodeons Low cost, ad hoc storefronts - Industry o The Trust (Motion Picture Patents Company) o Edison join US +French Pool patents Corner distribution Control film stock supply o Outcasts head west to freedom Silent Era D.W Griffth, Birth of a Nation (1915) - Feature Film o Multiple settings o Multiple storylines o Complex, numerous characters o Advanced/modern aesthetics o Extremely problematic content - Film as we know it Studio Era Vertical Integration - Studios integrate and control industry o Production o Distribution o Exhibition o All done in house (employ everything) - Industry o Assembly-line production
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o Contract players (studio signs actors, can do anything it wants) o Star System (has a slate of new actors and stars) o Distribution controls access to product o Exhibition and movie palaces - Industry Organizations o Big Three MGM Paramount Fox WB RXO o Little three United Artists Universal Columbia Pictures - Technological developments o Sound The Jazz Singer, 1928 Expensive shift, moved fast o Color More gradual, less expensive transition Generic conventions Not everyone thinks color is better Black and white movies was drama, and war dramas Color was more for comedy, kids o Film Style “Golden Age” Classical Hollywood Cinema Genre and style conventions Star System Narrative Editing like watching a stage (invisible aesthetics) National Shared culture (people started to go to the movies every single weekend, consumer drive increased) Extra credit Why its important why it relates too class, what you got out of, why it matters 250 words Film Style: Film/video/digital Studio era - Film style
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