A quick film overview

A quick film - A quick film overview Invention pre-1901 Early film era 1902-1915 Silent Film era 1915-1929 What we talk about when we talk about

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A quick film overview - Invention pre-1901 - Early film era 1902-1915 - Silent Film era 1915-1929 What we talk about when we talk about film - Industry o Production, distribution, exhibition o Structure and organization o People and developments - Style o Content and messages o Innovations o People and titles Invention and development - Illusion of motion o Persistence of vision (flip book) Psi effect (driving past Christmas lights, looks like motion) o Eadweard Muybridge and the racehorse Tried to figure out if a horse ever had all feet on the ground when running If we have enough pictures that are still, we have movement - Inventing the actual film (stock) o George Eastman: invented roll film o Hannibal Goodwin: celluloid - Inventing projection (Thomas Edison) o Kinetoscope Individual viewing cabinets Shorts film strips Play films but only one person can view it - Lumiere brothers o Projection, projected first film in 1895 o Audience of many - Vitascope o Projection o Long celluloid strips o Can combine projections and have longer reels - Exhibition & vaudeville (variety shows) - Novelty style Early Film
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- Film Style o Films tell stories Georges Melies, A trip to the Moon (1902) - American Director o Edwin S. Porter The Life of an American fireman (1902); The Great Train Robbery (1903) - Style and Culture o Vaudeville tradition o Working Classes and immigrants - Exhibition o Nickelodeons Low cost, ad hoc storefronts - Industry o The Trust (Motion Picture Patents Company) o Edison join US +French Pool patents Corner distribution Control film stock supply o Outcasts head west to freedom Silent Era D.W Griffth, Birth of a Nation (1915) - Feature Film o Multiple settings o Multiple storylines o Complex, numerous characters o Advanced/modern aesthetics o Extremely problematic content - Film as we know it Studio Era Vertical Integration - Studios integrate and control industry o Production o Distribution o Exhibition o All done in house (employ everything) - Industry o Assembly-line production
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Contract players (studio signs actors, can do anything it wants) o Star System (has a slate of new actors and stars) o Distribution controls access to product o Exhibition and movie palaces - Industry Organizations o Big Three MGM Paramount Fox WB RXO o Little three United Artists Universal Columbia Pictures - Technological developments o Sound The Jazz Singer, 1928 Expensive shift, moved fast o Color More gradual, less expensive transition Generic conventions Not everyone thinks color is better Black and white movies was drama, and war dramas Color was more for comedy, kids o Film Style “Golden Age” Classical Hollywood Cinema Genre and style conventions Star System Narrative Editing like watching a stage (invisible aesthetics) National Shared culture (people started to go to the movies every single weekend, consumer drive increased) Extra credit
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This note was uploaded on 01/17/2012 for the course COMM 189 taught by Professor Miller during the Fall '08 term at Rutgers.

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A quick film - A quick film overview Invention pre-1901 Early film era 1902-1915 Silent Film era 1915-1929 What we talk about when we talk about

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