Media 2 - 22:13 Newspapers and Journalism Newspaper...

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22:13 Newspapers and Journalism Newspaper development Early structure Colonial news Printing and ownership Early regulation John Peter Zenger and seditious libel New York weekly journal Resist British colonial servant  Charged with seditious libel Freedom of the press Technology Printing Printing press Rotary press Paper Scarcity and production Information Telegraph
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Early Journalism Industry Illiteracy, class and subscriptions Style and content Business and politics, local and abroad Partisan press and patronage Penny Press Journalism 1830s- 1990s Industry Competition and abundance Daily sales vs. subscription Style and content News for the middle and working class Human interest, crime, scandals Business, fashion, opinion, local interest  Yellow Journalism Journalism 1890s- 1920s W.H. Herst and New York Journal Joseph Pulitzer and New York World Style and content Lurid, salacious, fear-mongering
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Human interest, headlines, photos Fabricated and manufactured events “I’ll supply the war”  Investigative journalism “National conscious” and crusading causes Immigrant classes and assimilation  Modern Journalism Style and content Objective Journalism Objectivity as marketing Objectivity as goal or reality Interpretation and analysis Conflict vs. consensus journalism  Reporting, writing, culture Literary Gonzo Public Citizen Journalism is not reduced to professional journalists  Profit Partisan
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Aim for goal for political party Journalism and the Fourth Estate Keep those in power in check Watergate DNC vs. CRP Woodward and Bernstein, Deep Throat Industry Structure Newspaper organization Editorial vs. business operations Syndication and wire services (AP) Shared content  Newspaper ownership Family/private ownership Chain ownership Corporate ownership Join Operating Agreements (JOA)  Ideal that two papers in a single market is better for the public market  Greater wealth of information  Niche newspapers Immigrant, ethnic, minority papers
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Underground and alternative press Future of print journalism Newspapers, the internet, and the future Causes: Digital natives Alternative news sources Decreasing ad revenue Corporate ownership  Results: Media authority Fragmentation and selective exposure Bloggers and non-professionals Partisanship, self-interest  Laws and Ethics Ethics Ethical models Utilitarianism- leads to good consequence  Moralism- what provide benefits  John Stuart Mill- provide greatest good for greatest number of people
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Jeremy Bentham- decisions that benefit al Absolutism- black and white  Immanuel Kang- ethical codes are universal  Categorical imperative- right and wrong  Nihilism Friedrich Nietzsche Ethics are outdated  Egoism Anti-altruism Ayn Rand Relativism Universal or normative 
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This note was uploaded on 01/17/2012 for the course COMM 189 taught by Professor Miller during the Fall '08 term at Rutgers.

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Media 2 - 22:13 Newspapers and Journalism Newspaper...

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