Final Chapter 2 - In the previous chapter, we noted that...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Federalism 13 Chapter 2 Overview In the previous chapter, we noted that vertical division of power among different levels of governments is one of the major forms of power sharing in modern democracies. In this chapter, we focus on this form of power sharing. It is most commonly referred to as federalism. We begin by describing federalism in general terms. The rest of the chapter tries to understand the theory and practice of federalism in India. A discussion of the federal constitutional provisions is followed by an analysis of the policies and politics that has strengthened federalism in practice. Towards the end of the chapter, we turn to the local government, a new and third tier of Indian federalism.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
14 Democratic Politics What is federalism? Let us get back to the contrast between Belgium and Sri Lanka that we saw in the last chapter. You would recall that one of the key changes made in the Constitution of Belgium was to reduce the power of the Central Government and to give these powers to the regional governments. Regional governments existed in Belgium even earlier. They had their roles and powers. But all these powers were given to these governments and could be withdrawn by the Central Government. The change that took place in 1993 was that the regional governments were given constitutional powers that were no longer dependent on the central government. Thus, Belgium shifted from a unitary to a federal form of government. Sri Lanka continues to be, for all practical purposes, a unitary system where the national government has all the powers. Tamil leaders want Sri Lanka to become a federal system. Federalism is a system of government in which the power is divided between a central authority and various constituent units of the country. Usually, a federation has two levels of government. One is the government for the entire country that is usually responsible for a few subjects of common national interest. The others are governments at the level of provinces or states that look after much of the day-to-day administering of their state. Both these levels of governments enjoy their power independent of the other. I am confused. What do we call the Indian government? Is it Union, Federal or Central? Though only 25 of the world’s 192 countries have federal political systems, their citizens make up 40 per cent of the world’s population. Most of the large countries of the world are federations. Can you notice an exception to this rule in this map? Source: Montreal and Kingston, Handbook of Federal Countries: 2002 , McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2002. Federal political systems Canada United States of America Mexico PACIFIC OCEAN Micronesia Argentina Venezuela ATLANTIC OCEAN Brazil St. Kitts and Nevis Belgium Switzerland Spain Nigeria Ethiopia Comoros Bosnia and Herzegovina Austria Pakistan Russia India Malaysia Australia INDIAN OCEAN South Africa PACIFIC OCEAN United Arab Emirates Germany
Background image of page 2
Federalism 15 Jurisdiction: The area over which someone has legal authority. The area may be defined in
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/19/2012 for the course SOCIAL 3so taught by Professor Stevejoyce during the Fall '09 term at Central European University.

Page1 / 16

Final Chapter 2 - In the previous chapter, we noted that...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online