occupational analysis-lawyer

occupational analysis-lawyer - Kayla Murphy Psychology 3030...

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Kayla Murphy Psychology 3030 2:30 Occupation: Lawyer
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Occupational Description Lawyers, or attorneys, can work as advisors or advocates for any number of people or businesses. As an advisor, a lawyer counsels their client as to their legal rights and responsibilities and provides sound legal advice for whatever situation that client may face. As an advocate, a lawyer represents the client in a civil or criminal trial and provides evidence and arguments to support their client. Major Activities (information from O*Net.com) - Gathering evidence and information from relevant sources - Presenting solutions to problems - Conflict resolution and negotiation - Extensive communication with personnel outside the law firm or organization - Analyzing data Lawyers are not limited to working with any specific population. The majority of lawyers are employed in private practice investigating civil and criminal cases. Other lawyers are employed by the state and federal government as judges, solicitors, and public defenders. Some lawyers are employed by large corporations as in-house counsel. Other lawyers work for non- profit and private organizations in order to benefit disadvantaged populations. Lawyers who do not work directly as legal advisors or advocates may work as law school faculty or administrators. Lawyers do the majority of their work in their office or in law libraries. A small percentage of time is spent in the actual courtroom. A huge portion of a lawyer’s time is spent doing research and gathering evidence about a particular case. Lawyers must be very mobile and
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able to get in touch with their clients at all times, so high levels of technology are used to stay in contact at all times. Degrees, Licensure, and Training Requirements About seven years of full time school are required to become a lawyer. A bachelor’s degree from an accredited university is required for entrance to most American Bar Association (ABA) accredited schools. Acceptance to an accredited law school is typically dependent on undergraduate work, previous experience, and the Law School Admissions Test (LSAT). Sometimes a personal interview is required. All of these things are given a different level of importance by each individual law school. A very small number of law schools are not accredited by the ABA and only licensed by the state. Graduates from such schools are usually limited to practicing in the state which they graduated from. All lawyers must pass the accreditation exam given by the American Bar Association in the state which they intend to practice in. There are generally three parts to this exam, but not all states require each part. The three parts are the Multistate Bar Examination (MBE), Multistate Essay Examination (MEE), and the Multistate Performance Test (MPT). The MBE is used by 48 states and most U.S. territories and covers a very broad spectrum of topics. The MPT tests practical skills of lawyers. Some states require licensed lawyers to continue their education
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This note was uploaded on 01/19/2012 for the course PSYC 3980 taught by Professor Claffey during the Spring '09 term at University of Georgia Athens.

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occupational analysis-lawyer - Kayla Murphy Psychology 3030...

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