SOC FINAL - SOC FINAL 23:56 CHAPTER 14 Caste System...

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Unformatted text preview: SOC FINAL 23:56 CHAPTER 14 Caste System Hereditary rank, usually religiously dictated, tend to be immobile High degree of stratification people born into caste habitually receive different shares of resources than members of other castes Difficult, if not impossible, to move out of the caste in which someone was born In India: Birth determines occupation ascribed characteristics Hierarchy is kept intact via endogamous marriage Cultural beliefs support the system Members of different categories are kept apart Classes Come from inequalities in the possession and control of material resources and access to educational and occupational opportunities Dimensions used are not always correlated with each othercant rank class distinctions with a linear hierarchy Differ from other systems: Open and fluid Class positions are in some part achieved Class is economically based Systems are large scale and impersonal Three basic classes: Dominant, middle, lower; and 3 factions within each dominant, intermediate, dominated Types of Capital from Pierre Bourdieu Economic money to purchase goods Cultural education, interpersonal skills, habits, manners, linguistic styles, tastes Social connections and people you know Symbolic considered upper class but dont make income: clergy, priests, pastors, professors Bourgeoisie v Proletariat (MARX) Owners of the means of production, and workers who do not own capital Fundamental split between the groups Status Groups (WEBER) Network ties among those who share similar cultural symbols, tastes, outlooks, and lifestyles. As a result can command a certain level of deference, honor, and prestige Independent basis of stratification Stratification General term used to describe a society that distributes income, power, prestige, and other valued resources to its members unequally and creates distinctive classes of members who are culturally, behaviorally, and organizationally different The degree is determined by how unequally resources are distributed, how distinctive social classes are, how much mobility occurs between classes, and how permanent classes are 3 major types: slavery, caste, class Wealth Distribution Percentage of total wealth held by different percentages of the population, usually calculated in terms of wealth fifths Used as a rough indicator of the degree of inequality in a society Theoretical Approach to Class Stratification Marx Primary emphasis on class, seen as an objectively given characteristic of the economic structure of society Those who owns the means of production in a society (resources and capital used to produce goods and commodities) are able to control the house of power, cultural...
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SOC FINAL - SOC FINAL 23:56 CHAPTER 14 Caste System...

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