EAYH Lecture 12 Oct 13 - 17/10/201110:53:00 Lecture12...

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17/10/2011 10:53:00 Lecture 12 10/13/11 Hazardous Pollutants Green Corps Presentation ~1/6 American women have enough mercury in their bodies to cause birth  defects!  #1 source of mercury – coal!  Next Tuesday will be conclusion of material that will be covered on EXAM NEXT  THURSDAY. Exam will be cumulative (though primarily focused on new material). Exam  Review Session next Tuesday,  Criteria pollutants – set regulatory criteria and limit Hazardous Pollutants – no regulatory limit  Copsa Mica, Romania smelters  releasing 67,000 tons of So2 (primary criteria that also forms ACID  RAIN), 500 tons of  lead (found in gas, paints, SMELTERS) , 400 tons of zinc, and 4 tons  of cadmium released annually In 1989 was one of most polluted places in Europe Highest infant mortality rate in Europe; 30% of children suffered reduced lung  function  10% of population (20K) suffered “neuro-behavioral problems” smelters shut down in 1993
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Air pollution doesn't stay where it is produced- it travels! Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPS) 1990 CAA amendment specified 188 pollutants or chemical groups HAPs are MORE TOXIC than criteria pollutants ; they “. ..may reasonably be  expected to result in serious irreversible. .. disease, including cancer” –  Carcinogens Examples heavy metals (chromium, mercury) organics (benzene, perchloroehtylene) Formaldehyde (carcinogen) – prevalent in plywood   There is a risk of associated in regions where there are hazardous air pollutants  – risk for getting cancer is quite high  MAP- highest regions were CA, TX, FL, GA, IL, MI, Northeast Air Toxics Sources Area Sources (18%) dry cleaning operations solvent cleaning secondary lead smelters and chrome plating  commercial sterilizers
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Large Industrial Complexes (61% - Point Sources) chemical plants oil refineries steel mills aerospace manufacturers marine tank vessel loading Mobile Sources (21%) Air Toxics Ambient Air Quality Data  Release 1993: ~8.3 million tons National Toxics Release Inventory (organized and regulated by STATES) No reliable network to measure      ambient levels of air toxics (HAPS) Health Effects Little human info available most derived from experimental animal  studies Potential health effects: cancer, neurological, cardiovascular, and respiratory effects; effects on liver,  kidneys, immune system, and reproductive system, and effects on fetal and child  development about  ½ of HAPs have been classified as “known,” “probable,” or “possible”   carcinogens
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This note was uploaded on 01/19/2012 for the course PUBLIC HEA 280.335 taught by Professor Dr.trush during the Fall '11 term at Johns Hopkins.

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EAYH Lecture 12 Oct 13 - 17/10/201110:53:00 Lecture12...

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