15 - 15. Transport therefore primitive: by far the easiest...

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15. Transport therefore primitive: by far the easiest way to move things around was by sea or river, using wind as the source of energy. Thus the great early civilizations for the most part grew up around rivers and the sea -- China, India, Japan, Egypt, the Middle East, and Rome. Note that feeding major cities of the size of Rome or Beijing was a big problem: in the case of Rome food came via the Mediterranean, mainly from North Africa: in the case of China it came from the south via the Grand Canal or coastal shipping. 16. Because transport was poor, trade was also slow and limited in what was traded: goods had to be (a) valuable and (b) not perishable. So much of the trade on the silk road was in luxuries: textiles, gold, ivory, etc. Partial exceptions were slaves and animals who could walk and who could therefore be traded over long distances. 17. Because of the problem of transport, every-day goods tended to be produced locally and not moved very far. So work places were small, both in terms of size
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This note was uploaded on 01/17/2012 for the course SCIE SYG2000 taught by Professor Bernhardt during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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15 - 15. Transport therefore primitive: by far the easiest...

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