A Fully Social Theory Of Deviance

A Fully Social Theory Of Deviance - A Fully Social Theory...

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A Fully Social Theory Of Deviance? In the second section of these Notes we can start to look at the way Radical Criminologists have suggested we can, sociologically, theorise deviant behaviour . In this respect, the most conceptually coherent, outline of such a theory of deviance has been provided by Taylor, Walton and Young ("The New Criminology", 1973) and it is to an understanding of these ideas that we can now turn. You should, however, note that this section of Notes is organised along the following lines: 1. Firstly, an outline of Taylor, Walton and Young's seven principles of a radical theory of deviance. This involves a general discussion of each principle. 2. Secondly, we can apply these principles to a specific example of deviant behaviour, namely sex crimes such as rape. To help us do this, a reading from Soothill and Grover ("The Social Construction of Sex Offenders", 1995 in Sociology Review ) will be used as the basis for the analysis. 3. Thirdly, an example taken from the work of Hall et al ("Policing The Crisis", 1978) forms the basis of an application of Taylor, Walton and Young's seven principles to an economic form of crime, namely "mugging". Although this represents a rather long-winded way of doing things, each of the above interpretations and applications will help you to come to terms with a theory that is both abstract and highly speculative.
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Taylor, Walton and Young: Seven Theoretical Principles_ Taylor, Walton and Young outline seven aspects or dimensions to a fully social theory of deviance . While each aspect is theoretically-distinct, they argue that the power of their theoretical conception derives from the way each aspect combines with and builds upon the others to produce an overall theoretical explanation of deviance. If we now outline each element in the theory, in turn, we can perhaps begin to understand this idea more-clearly. 1. The Wider Origins of the Deviant Act
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This note was uploaded on 01/17/2012 for the course SCIE SYG2000 taught by Professor Bernhardt during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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A Fully Social Theory Of Deviance - A Fully Social Theory...

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