Deviance - Deviance: Absolute or Relative? As I've...

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Deviance: Absolute or Relative? As I’ve suggested above, the question of whether or not deviance (and by extension, crime) is an absolute or a relative concept is significant in this context. If, for example, we can define deviance in an absolute way it would mean that in all societies and at all times certain forms of behaviour will be considered deviant. If valid, this idea is significant in two ways: Firstly, it would mean that all societies would, for some reason or other, develop rules that proscribed certain forms of behaviour (or “acts”, to use the jargon). If this were the case, by understanding the reasons for such proscriptions we would be able to understand the essential nature of deviance and social control. Secondly, it would mean that the study of deviance should concentrate on why people break certain rules. That is, it would necessarily focus on the deviant (or criminal) and, by so doing, would focus on a variety of factors, both psychological (deviants as “damaged personalities, for example) or social (family and educational background,
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Deviance - Deviance: Absolute or Relative? As I've...

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