Informal Deviance - Informal Deviance Informal deviance...

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Informal Deviance Informal deviance refers to the fact that an individual (or group of individuals) may be slightly non-conformist to the general trend of society; however, his/her/their behaviour does not constitute an illegal act. In Sociology you will find lots of examples of informal deviants – a recent example is David Blaine; Informal deviants are people / groups of people therefore whose behaviour might raise an eyebrow but will not encourage a person to call the police. Informal deviants are people who are simply “different” for some reason or another. In effect, it is fair to say that we are all informally deviant to some degree or another. In Sociology, there is a fascination with young people because of their informally deviant tendencies – particularly when looking at youth subcultures A subculture = a group of people in society whose behaviour (and sometimes style of dress) is significantly different from wider society – so much so that they have a unique culture (away of life). However, because they still exist within our society they are called sub cultures. Formal Deviance Formal deviance, quite simply, describes an act committed by a person or group of persons that contravenes (goes against) the established laws of society. A formal deviant is therefore a criminal. Key examples of clear formal deviants are; Harold Shipman, Ted Bundy and Ian Huntley (can you think of any more?) What Haralambos is saying in this above quote therefore, is that what is regarded
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Informal Deviance - Informal Deviance Informal deviance...

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