Introductio4 - Introduction. 1. Most, if not all, A-level...

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Introduction. 1. Most, if not all, A-level Sociology students begin their course with a fairly vague idea about what is involved in the “study of society”. A copy of the syllabus is an initial starting point because it maps-out for you the areas you will be studying during your course. However, it doesn’t tell you a great deal about what Sociology is. This Introduction, therefore, is designed to help you identify the subject matter of Sociology and, to help us do this we will be looking at four main ideas: a. An initial definition of Sociology as a subject. b. The types of questions that sociologists ask. c. The Sociological Perspective (how Sociology differs from other social sciences). d. The difference between Naturalistic (or commonsense) and sociological ideas and explanations. A. The Subject Matter of Sociology. 1. As I noted above, Sociology is the study of human societies. It is usually classed as one of the social sciences (along with subjects like psychology)
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This note was uploaded on 01/17/2012 for the course SCIE SYG2000 taught by Professor Bernhardt during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Introductio4 - Introduction. 1. Most, if not all, A-level...

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