Post - Post-Durkheim Positivism and Suicide As...

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Post-Durkheim Positivism and Suicide. As Taylor ("Suicide", 1988) notes: "Although there have been hundreds of subsequent studies of suicide rates (not all by sociologists), no one since Durkheim has attempted to construct a complete, embracing theory of suicide. Many later studies have restricted themselves either to 'testing' the relationship between suicide and particular variables, or to refining and developing aspects of Durkheim's theory.". There are a number of different studies which we can briefly outline, in the above respect: 1. Halbwachs ("The Causes of Suicide", 1930): In this study, one aspect of suicide that Halbwachs identified was that related to the concept of "social isolation". Individuals who were socially isolated, in some way, suffered from a form of under regulation / lack of social integration and this made them more-susceptible to suicidal forms of behaviour. 2. Sainsbury ("Suicide In London", 1955) took the above a step further by trying to test the idea of the relationship between social isolation and suicide. Sainsbury found that
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Post - Post-Durkheim Positivism and Suicide As...

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