Summary2 - Summary 1. Radical criminology originated in...

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Summary 1. Radical criminology originated in Britain in the early 1970's, mainly through the work of Paul Taylor, Ian Walton and Jock Young ("The New Criminology", 1973; "Critical Criminology", 1975 (Ed's)). 2. Radical criminology attempted to combine various Marxist concepts (social structure, economic exploitation, alienation and so forth) with a number of Interactionist concepts (social reaction, primary and secondary deviation and so forth) in a "new" theory of crime and deviance. In this respect, Radical criminology attempted to combine a Marxist theory of power with a form of labelling theory. 3. In order to understand both criminal and non-criminal behaviour, Radical criminologists argued that we have to understand the social framework within which laws are created and applied by and to various groups in society. 4. "Laws" are not "neutral" expressions of social relationships; on the contrary, they are created and applied in capitalist societies for two main reasons: a. To protect certain property rights (laws governing theft, contract rights, etc.).
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This note was uploaded on 01/17/2012 for the course SCIE SYG2000 taught by Professor Bernhardt during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Summary2 - Summary 1. Radical criminology originated in...

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