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The Social Reaction Approach to Suicide

The Social Reaction Approach to Suicide - The Social...

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The Social Reaction Approach to Suicide. This approach to the explanation of suicide emphasises the importance of studying the social reaction of others to the "potentially suicidal" individual and is probably best- illustrated by the work of: 1. Rushing ("Deviant Behaviour and Social Process", 1975): In this instance, the argument is that suicide (or attempted suicide) is frequently preceded by some form of deviant behaviour (such as alcoholism, drug abuse or economic failure): The labelling of the individual as a deviant weakens his / her self-esteem, frequently leads to social isolation and, in such instances makes the possibility of suicidal behaviour more likely. 2. Kobler and Stotland ("The End of Hope", 1964): In their investigation of a "suicide epidemic" in a mental hospital, Kobler and Stotland sought to understand suicide in terms of: a. The patients' perception of their situation: For the majority, the hospital was seen as a "last hope" for a successful recovery.
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