The Fiftie9 - such as irrigating wounds or filling a steam...

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The Fifties Young people drank fewer malts and more plain soda than media would have you think. They also slugged down the milk to an enormous extent — most kids drank over a quart of milk a day. For some younger kids, it was their main source of nutrition. Powdered drinks or additives like Kool-Aid or Nestle Quik were introduced to keep things interesting. Breastfeeding, much like fresh produce, was seen as vulgar, cow-like, even if it took place in the mother's home. A woman who breastfed a child over about 13 months of age could easily be reported to Social Services for child abuse. Formula, by contrast, was modern and scientific and hence hugely superior. Water fountains were everywhere. In the South they were segregated. Bottled water was not sold for drinking (you could buy distilled water at a pharmacy for certain reasons,
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Unformatted text preview: such as irrigating wounds or filling a steam iron in hard-water areas), but given the ubiquity of drinking fountains and their known cleanliness and safety, nobody needed bottled water for drinking. Headlines: The Home: For the first time, it was often located in a planned suburb or 'bedroom community', i.e. left for work and returned to at night to sleep rather than specifically 'the city' or 'the country'. Economic prosperity, readily available housing loans, the advent of more innovative and reliable transportation (such as commuter trains and trolley cars) and a general postwar desire to settle down and raise a family all contributed to the rise of North American suburban culture. Long Island, NY is usually credited with the world's first large-scale development of this type....
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