Tsarist Russi3 - a roaring drunk , though a shrewd and...

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Tsarist Russia The death (or a secret abdication — there was a persistent rumor at the time that Alexander I faked his own death and entered a monastery, and later the famous monk Feodor was said to be the abdicated Emperor) of Alexander I far from the capital engendered a coup attempt by liberal army officers known as the Decembrists who tried to put in place a democratic constitution — though it would probably strike the modern reader as rather stretching this definition . Nicholas I crushed the revolt and became a hated reactionary, and lost the Crimean War. Under Alexander II, many important reforms were implemented and the last vestiges of feudalism were removed, but a lot of these reforms were of the "too little too late" mold, and made it difficult for the country to adapt well to capitalism. To add the insult to the injury, the later emperors Alexander III (a very conservative giant of a man, a reactionary and
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Unformatted text preview: a roaring drunk , though a shrewd and cautious ruler and a good diplomat) and his son Nicholas II a weak and indecisive ruler, who constantly varied his policy and was basically a Tsar Focus Group reversed many of these reforms. This resulted in an impoverished country. Well, the economy was booming, but the political climate was stifling, the wealth distribution unbelievably skewed and the intellectual classes widely believed the country to be a basket case which caused them to adopt a "the worse the better" attitude, and dive into the revolutionary ideas. A massive revolt followed, culminating in the overthrow of the Tsar and the Red October . And the rest is the matter of another article . It was an absolute monarchy (between the 17th century and 1905), ruled by a Tsar or a Tsarina until the Russian Empire and an Emperor after that, but the latter was still usually called the Tsar....
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