Chapter_7++USE

Chapter_7++USE - Intro to Sociology Chap 7 & 8 Chapter...

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Intro to Sociology –  Chap 7 & 8
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Chapter 7 Stratification, Class, and Inequality
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Who gets ahead and why? Who are the rich? Who are  the poor?  What affects a person’s life  chances and how? Social inequality, the  unequal distribution of  valued resources, exists in  every society.  Social Stratification & Social Mobility
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Class Although it is one of the most frequently used  concepts in sociology, There is no clear cut agreement about how the  concept sb defined. Most sociologists use the term to refer to the  socioeconomic variations between groups of  individuals that create variations in their material  prosperity and power
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Class A social class ~ A large group of people who occupy a similar  economic position in the wider society. The concept of life chances (Weber) gives us  the best way to understand what class means. Your  life chances  are the opportunities you have for  achieving economic prosperity.
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Life chances A person from a humble background has  less chance of ending up wealthy than  someone from a more prosperous one. The best chance an individual has of being  wealthy is to start of as wealthy in the first  place. However, it is a bit more hopeful
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Social stratification is the division of people  socioeconomically into layers, or strata. When we  talk of social stratification, we draw attention to  the unequal positions occupied by individuals in  society.  Larger traditional societies and industrialized  countries today have less stratification in terms of  wealth, property, and access to material goods and  cultural products.  Systems of Stratification
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Systems of stratification The division of people socioeconomically into layers  or strata. Points out the unequal positions occupied by individuals  in society. Slavery (Legal or religious sanctioned inequality) Caste (Legal or religious sanctioned inequality) Class (Divisions not “officially” recognized but  stem from economic factors affecting material  circumstances of people’s lives)
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Slavery:  the most extreme  form of legalized social  inequality. Enslaved  individuals are  owned  by  other people. Caste systems:  hereditary  rank, usually religiously  dictated, that tend to be  immobile. (p. 183) Systems of Stratification
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Other systems of stratification Slavery Extreme form of inequality in  which certain ppl were owned  by others. The legal conditions of which 
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Chapter_7++USE - Intro to Sociology Chap 7 & 8 Chapter...

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