Chapter+5+Groups+Networks+Organizations

Chapter+5+Groups+Networks+Organizations - Chapter Five...

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Chapter Five – Groups, Networks, and Organizations Intro to Soc
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Building blocks of society Societies, especially large ones such as that of the u.s. are highly complex. They have so many diverse characteristics – their customs, religions, politics, economies, families, schools, and so on – that it may be frustrating to try to make sense of what they are truly like. Nevertheless, sociologists have long been aware of certain patterns in the way societies operate. Most important, all societies can carry on in the face of differences and conflicts among their members because they have developed certain building blocks – the foundations of societies – called statuses, roles, groups, and institutions.
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Building blocks of society Statuses Roles Groups Organizations Institutions
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Statuses Position in society (different from the lay definition of prestige) People usually behave in accordance to their statuses Ascribed statuses – given to us independently of what we do. Achieved statuses – Result from what we do – earned. Master status – A status that dominates a relationship Subordinate statuses – Opposite of master status. A status that does not dominate a relationship Status inconsistency – The condition in which the same individual is given two conflicting status rankings.
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In our complex society, we have so many statuses that it is impossible to name them all. Some you are born with, such a male or female a racialized social category or ethnic identity. These statuses are called ascribed statuses. They are given to us independently of what we do. Age, Race, Gender, some argue social class are some examples. All other statuses result from what we do. We earn them in some way. You must do something to gain the status of a student or college graduate or married person or countless other things. These are called achieved statuses, and are attained through our own actions. In modern societies such as the U.S., achieved statuses have grown in influence at the expense of ascribed statuses. In place of a king or queen who inherits the position, for example, we have a president who must win the office.
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Statuses are sometimes ranked, with one being considered higher than the other. In the U.S. the position of doctor is ranked higher than that of plumber. In a family, the father’s status is higher than the son’s But other statuses are merely different, not higher or lower. A sociology majors status is different but essentially equal to that of a history major.
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Chapter+5+Groups+Networks+Organizations - Chapter Five...

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