FD1 - Morales Allan Richmond R. Morales Mr. Annarelli...

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Morales Allan Richmond R. Morales Mr. Annarelli Period 4, AP European History 12 October 2010 The Witch Hunt: Misogynistic to a Certain Extent During the early modern era, thousands of women were executed as witches. The theory that the witch hunt was based on misogynistic sentiments is reasonable, but the shift in religious, social, and economic conditions provides more details on such sentiments. A stronger Protestant emphasis on Satan spurred texts suggesting the depravity of women. The outbreak of syphilis caused greater suspicion of female sexuality and promiscuity. And women of various ages and stations were deemed financial burdens or threats to society. Nevertheless, the witch hunt could not have been fully misogynistic if a considerate number of men were also indicted as witches. Ironically, religion had exacerbated misogynistic views because the Protestant Reformation, though it did not cause the witch-hunt, put greater emphasis on the depraved nature of humanity especially women’s by increasing the fear of Satan. “Luther did contrast the witches' union with the Devil to the Protestant ideal of womanly obedience in marriage…. [by categorizing women as either] evil, syphilitic whores or chaste, respectable women” ( Roper). And Calvin had stressed that that anyone could be deceived by the cunning treachery of Satan. In addition to these popular beliefs, the advent of the printing press, while it did aid in increasing literacy rates, also facilitated in promoting misogyny by publishing such manuscripts as the
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FD1 - Morales Allan Richmond R. Morales Mr. Annarelli...

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