Hamlet syntax

Hamlet syntax - SYNTAX passages and explanations. 1....

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SYNTAX passages and explanations. 1. Tomorrow is St. Valentine's day / All in the morning betime / And I a maid at your window / To be your Valentine. / Then up he rose and donn'd his clothes / and dupp'd the chamber door; / Let in the maid, that out a maid / Never departed more. (IV.v) After finding out that her father Polonius has been killed, Ophelia becomes insane and speaks in song. But why does she sing about a maid seduced by her lover? Most of her songs are, in fact, about betrayed love, which makes sense because Hamlet suddenly despises her presence with no explanation. Furthermore, her songs are disjointed, lacking any rhyme yet contains rhythmic prose. Unlike Hamlet, Ophelia cannot cope with a loved one’s death and commits suicide. 2. Though yet of Hamlet our dear brother's death / The memory be green, and that it us befitted / To bear our hearts in grief and our whole kingdom / Yet so far hath discretion fought with nature / That we with wisest sorrow think on him, / Together with
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This note was uploaded on 01/19/2012 for the course SCHOLARS 1111 taught by Professor Mason during the Spring '11 term at GWU.

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Hamlet syntax - SYNTAX passages and explanations. 1....

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