week 9 - Week 9 notes: When that single egg is fertilized...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
When that single egg is fertilized by that lucky sperm then its life will start. Flowering plants: 2 main groups (PICTURE IN BOOK!) Monocots: one cotyledon, veins usually parallel, vascular bundles usually complexly arranged, Fiborous root system Eudicots (dicots): two cotyledons, veins usually netlike, vascular bundles usually arranged in ring, Taproot usually present Monocot: seedlings each have 1 cotyledon (seed leaf); in monocots the cotyledon often remains within the confines of the seed. Corn is an example. Dicot: seedlings each have 2 cotyledons (seed leaves). Example is bean. The seed takes up water and turns them on to form the root and the shoot of the plant. Organs of flowering plants: Roots Primary root- first to appear Dicot uses a Taproot system Monocot uses a Fibrous root system Organs of flowering plants Root hairs are extensions of epidermal cells. This gives this root a lot of contact surface area with the soil. It can help take up water and nutrients. October 19, 2011 IMPORTANT: CNN: Link “With 7 billion on earth we have a major task before us” Link will be posted on moodle. Read it because there will be one question from it on the test. Organs of flowering plants Root hairs are extensions of epidermal cells o Epidermal-Single layer of cell separates inside from outside of root (on a plant) Root hairs dramatically increase a root’s surface area for absorbing water and nutrients o Each hair takes up water, minerals and nutrients Food storage is a function of all roots, but some (e.g., carrot taproots) are highly modified for storage. o Play a major role in storing access sugar in a plant. o Fungal partner and plant root partner symbiotic relationship Aboveground (aerial or prop) roots give extra support o Modified roots that help prop the plant up and give it support o All roots are used to store sugar. “Breathing” roots conduct oxygen to waterlogged roots o Roots made out of millions of cells that need oxygen to stay alive. The roots of many orchids are photosynthetic o Found on the aerial parts of other organism. o
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/19/2012 for the course ACCT 2000 taught by Professor Holmes during the Fall '08 term at LSU.

Page1 / 6

week 9 - Week 9 notes: When that single egg is fertilized...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online