{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Chapter 3

Chapter 3 - Chapter 3 – Fiber Properties • property –...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Chapter 3 – Fiber Properties • property – a quality or characteristic of a textile fiber – each fiber type exhibits many properties that are unique by each fiber type – determines how a fiber type behaves in use – may be inherent or can be changed – In the US, we use yd,lb,oz to explain. Internationally, we use the metric measurement system • Physical Properties – We can view these properties both with the naked eye or microscope – Physically properties affect appearance and behavior of yarns & fabrics – color • natural fibers vary in color (example: black and white sheep) • manufactured fibers are “bright” or white – shape and contour • cross-section view • round, oval, u-shaped, triangular (looks like bamboo or lay inn clumps) • Can have a hollow center • multilobal • Round • Kidney • Look in book! – longitudinal form view • smooth • rough, uneven • striations (dark lines) or scales (overlapping scales on wool fiber) – luster • amount of light reflected by a fiber • affected by cross-sectional shape • flat direct light back to eye • multilobal shaped fibers bounce light in all directions (more lustrous) • manufactured fibers • can create any lobe shape (this affects the luster) • can be delustered by titanium dioxide – covering power • ability of a fabric to obscure an object • visual aspect • ability of a fiber to hide what is placed beneath it • the more transparent, the less covering power • Geometric aspect • amount of fiber required to make a fabric cover an area • the more fiber, the more covering power • the more fiber surface area, the more covering power • this makes it less likely to show soil – crimp • a wavy undulating structure • increases resilience, bulk, warmth, and cohesiveness • cohesiveness • ability of fibers to cling together when making yarns • manufactured fibers can be textured • Manufacturers do not exit the spinneret with a crimp. It must be textured after. – length • staple fibers • inches, centimeters • cotton, wool • filament fibers • yards, meters • silk, manufactured – affects hand • the feel of the fabric • If manufacturers do not like the smoothness (hand) of filament fibers, it can be textured • density – the ratio of a mass of a substance to a unit of volume – grams per cubic centimeter specific gravity – the density of a fiber in relation to the density of an equal volume of water at a...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 11

Chapter 3 - Chapter 3 – Fiber Properties • property –...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon bookmark
Ask a homework question - tutors are online