Chapter 3 Continued

Chapter 3 Continued - Chapter3Continued 19:52...

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Chapter 3 Continued 19:52 Abrasion Resistance  Flat abrasion Chair arm Edge abrasion Cuff edge Flex abrasion  Folded linens Frosting Results in color change  Toughness  Is affected by the tenacity of the fiber and elongation Polyester  High tenacity High elongation Linen  High tenacity  Low elongation Pilling  Surface fibers break and migrate to the surface to form balls that cling to the surface Cost Least expensive fibers: Olefin is the LEAST expensive fiber Lightest of fibers Will float on water Difficult to dye (because it floats) Low melting point
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Polyester and cotton 75% of fibers used are either cotton or polyester used in a place of more expensive fibers polyester is replacing nylon more often growing in usage
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Chapter 4 – Natural Cellulosic Fibers 19:52 Plant Sources: Seed hair fibers Grow in seed pod Bast fibers Removed from stems Leaf fibers Found on leaves Miscellaneous fibers
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This note was uploaded on 01/19/2012 for the course HUEC 2040 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at LSU.

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Chapter 3 Continued - Chapter3Continued 19:52...

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